Air tightness of new houses in the U.S.: A preliminary report

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Description

Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S. dwellings over the past decades. LBNL has collected the available data on residential infiltration into its Residential Diagnostics Database, with ... continued below

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14 pages

Creation Information

Sherman, Max H. & Matson, Nance E. March 1, 2002.

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Description

Most dwellings in the United States are ventilated primarily through leaks in the building shell (i.e., infiltration) rather than by whole-house mechanical ventilation systems. Consequently, quantification of envelope air-tightness is critical to determining how much energy is being lost through infiltration and how much infiltration is contributing toward ventilation requirements. Envelope air tightness and air leakage can be determined from fan pressurization measurements with a blower door. Tens of thousands of unique fan pressurization measurements have been made of U.S. dwellings over the past decades. LBNL has collected the available data on residential infiltration into its Residential Diagnostics Database, with support from the U.S. Department of Energy. This report documents the envelope air leakage section of the LBNL database, with particular emphasis on new construction. The work reported here is an update of similar efforts carried out a decade ago, which used available data largely focused on the housing stock, rather than on new construction. The current effort emphasizes shell tightness measurements made on houses soon after they are built. These newer data come from over two dozen datasets, including over 73,000 measurements spread throughout a majority of the U.S. Roughly one-third of the measurements are for houses identified as energy-efficient through participation in a government or utility program. As a result, the characteristics reported here provide a quantitative estimate of the impact that energy-efficiency programs have on envelope tightness in the US, as well as on trends in construction.

Physical Description

14 pages

Notes

OSTI as DE00795333

Source

  • Other Information: PBD: 1 Mar 2002

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  • Report No.: LBNL--48671
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • DOI: 10.2172/795333 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 795333
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc741159

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Creation Date

  • March 1, 2002

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 19, 2015, 7:39 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 1, 2016, 8:36 p.m.

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Sherman, Max H. & Matson, Nance E. Air tightness of new houses in the U.S.: A preliminary report, report, March 1, 2002; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc741159/: accessed August 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.