Evaluation Framework and Tools for Distributed Energy Resources

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The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 2002 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) forecast anticipates the need for 375 MW of new generating capacity (or about one new power plant) per week for the next 20 years, most of which is forecast to be fueled by natural gas. The Distributed Energy and Electric Reliability Program (DEER) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has set a national goal for DER to capture 20 percent of new electric generation capacity additions by 2020 (Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 2000). Cumulatively, this amounts to about 40 GW of DER capacity additions from 2000-2020. Figure ... continued below

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73 pages; OS: pc

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Gumerman, Etan Z.; Bharvirkar, Ranjit R.; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi & Marnay , Chris February 1, 2003.

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Description

The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 2002 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) forecast anticipates the need for 375 MW of new generating capacity (or about one new power plant) per week for the next 20 years, most of which is forecast to be fueled by natural gas. The Distributed Energy and Electric Reliability Program (DEER) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has set a national goal for DER to capture 20 percent of new electric generation capacity additions by 2020 (Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 2000). Cumulatively, this amounts to about 40 GW of DER capacity additions from 2000-2020. Figure ES-1 below compares the EIA forecast and DEER's assumed goal for new DER by 2020 while applying the same definition of DER to both. This figure illustrates that the EIA forecast is consistent with the overall DEER DER goal. For the purposes of this study, Berkeley Lab needed a target level of small-scale DER penetration upon which to hinge consideration of benefits and costs. Because the AEO2002 forecasted only 3.1 GW of cumulative additions from small-scale DER in the residential and commercial sectors, another approach was needed to estimate the small-scale DER target. The focus here is on small-scale DER technologies under 500 kW. The technology size limit is somewhat arbitrary, but the key results of interest are marginal additional costs and benefits around an assumed level of penetration that existing programs might achieve. Berkeley Lab assumes that small-scale DER has the same growth potential as large scale DER in AEO2002, about 38 GW. This assumption makes the small-scale goal equivalent to 380,000 DER units of average size 100 kW. This report lays out a framework whereby the consequences of meeting this goal might be estimated and tallied up. The framework is built around a list of major benefits and a set of tools that might be applied to estimate them. This study lists some of the major effects of an emerging paradigm shift away from central station power and towards a more dispersed and heterogeneous power system. Seventeen societal effects of small-scale DER are briefly summarized. Each effect is rated as high, medium or low, on three different scales that will help determine the optimal social investment. The three scales are: the magnitude of the economic benefit; the likelihood that the benefit can be monetized in efficient markets, i.e. internalized; and how tractable it might be to quantify each benefit analytically. Some of the modeling tools that may be used to estimate these effects are described in the Appendix.

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73 pages; OS: pc

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OSTI as DE00816218

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  • Other Information: PBD: 1 Feb 2003

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  • Report No.: LBNL--52079
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • DOI: 10.2172/816218 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 816218
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc740860

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  • February 1, 2003

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 18, 2015, 6:40 p.m.

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  • April 4, 2016, 3:13 p.m.

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Gumerman, Etan Z.; Bharvirkar, Ranjit R.; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi & Marnay , Chris. Evaluation Framework and Tools for Distributed Energy Resources, report, February 1, 2003; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc740860/: accessed September 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.