A flexible object-oriented software framework for developing complex multimedia simulations.

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Decision makers involved in brownfields redevelopment and long-term stewardship must consider environmental conditions, future-use potential, site ownership, area infrastructure, funding resources, cost recovery, regulations, risk and liability management, community relations, and expected return on investment in a comprehensive and integrated fashion to achieve desired results. Successful brownfields redevelopment requires the ability to assess the impacts of redevelopment options on multiple interrelated aspects of the ecosystem, both natural and societal. Computer-based tools, such as simulation models, databases, and geographical information systems (GISs) can be used to address brownfields planning and project execution. The transparent integration of these tools into a comprehensive ... continued below

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8 pages

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Sydelko, P. J.; Dolph, J. E. & Christiansen, J. H. May 3, 2002.

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Description

Decision makers involved in brownfields redevelopment and long-term stewardship must consider environmental conditions, future-use potential, site ownership, area infrastructure, funding resources, cost recovery, regulations, risk and liability management, community relations, and expected return on investment in a comprehensive and integrated fashion to achieve desired results. Successful brownfields redevelopment requires the ability to assess the impacts of redevelopment options on multiple interrelated aspects of the ecosystem, both natural and societal. Computer-based tools, such as simulation models, databases, and geographical information systems (GISs) can be used to address brownfields planning and project execution. The transparent integration of these tools into a comprehensive and dynamic decision support system would greatly enhance the brownfields assessment process. Such a system needs to be able to adapt to shifting and expanding analytical requirements and contexts. The Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) is a flexible, extensible, object-oriented framework for developing and maintaining complex multidisciplinary simulations of a wide variety of application domains. The modeling domain of a specific DIAS-based simulation is determined by (1) software objects that represent the real-world entities that comprise the problem space (atmosphere, watershed, human), and (2) simulation models and other data processing applications that express the dynamic behaviors of the domain entities. Models and applications used to express dynamic behaviors can be either internal or external to DIAS, including existing legacy models written in various languages (FORTRAN, C, etc.). The flexible design framework of DIAS makes the objects adjustable to the context of the problem without a great deal of recoding. The DIAS Spatial Data Set facility allows parameters to vary spatially depending on the simulation context according to any of a number of 1-D, 2-D, or 3-D topologies. DIAS is also capable of interacting with other GIS packages and can import many standard spatial data formats. DIAS simulation capabilities can also be extended by including societal process models. Models that implement societal behaviors of individuals and organizations within larger DIAS-based natural systems simulations allow for interaction and feedback among natural and societal processes. The ability to simulate the complex interplay of multimedia processes makes DIAS a promising tool for constructing applications for comprehensive community planning, including the assessment of multiple development and redevelopment scenarios.

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8 pages

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  • International Conference on Prevention, Assessment, Rehabitation and Development of Brownfields Sites, Cadiz (ES), 09/02/2002--09/04/2002

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  • Report No.: ANL/DIS/CP-107595
  • Grant Number: W-31-109-ENG-38
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 801609
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc739247

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  • May 3, 2002

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 19, 2015, 7:39 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • March 21, 2016, 5:49 p.m.

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Sydelko, P. J.; Dolph, J. E. & Christiansen, J. H. A flexible object-oriented software framework for developing complex multimedia simulations., article, May 3, 2002; Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc739247/: accessed August 24, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.