New Metal Niobate and Silicotitanate Ion Exchangers: Development and Characterization

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This renewal proposal outlines our current progress and future research plans for ion exchangers: novel metal niobate and silicotitanate ion exchangers and their ultimate deployment in the DOE complex. In our original study several forms (including Cs exchanged) of the heat treated Crystalline Silicotitanates (CSTs) were fully characterized by a combination of high temperature synthesis and phase identification, low temperature synthesis and phase identification, and thermodynamics. This renewal proposal is predicated on work completed in our current EMSP program: we have shown preliminary data of a novel class of niobate-based molecular sieves (Na/Nb/M/O, M = transition metals), which show exceptionally ... continued below

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22k pages

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Navrotsky, Alexandra; Balmer, Mary Lou; Nenoff, Tina M. & Su, Yali December 5, 2003.

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Description

This renewal proposal outlines our current progress and future research plans for ion exchangers: novel metal niobate and silicotitanate ion exchangers and their ultimate deployment in the DOE complex. In our original study several forms (including Cs exchanged) of the heat treated Crystalline Silicotitanates (CSTs) were fully characterized by a combination of high temperature synthesis and phase identification, low temperature synthesis and phase identification, and thermodynamics. This renewal proposal is predicated on work completed in our current EMSP program: we have shown preliminary data of a novel class of niobate-based molecular sieves (Na/Nb/M/O, M = transition metals), which show exceptionally high selectivity for divalent cations under extreme conditions (acid solutions, competing cations), in addition to novel silicotitanate phases which are also selective for divalent cations. Furthermore, these materials are easily converted by a high temperature in-situ heat treatment into a refractory ceramic waste form with low cation leachability. The new waste form is a perovskite phase, which is also a major component of Synroc, a titanate ceramic waste form used for sequestration of HLW wastes from reprocessed, spent nuclear fuel. These new niobate ion exchangers also shown orders of magnitude better selectivity for Sr2+ under acid conditions than any other material. The goal of the program is to reduce the costs associated with divalent cation waste removal and disposal, to minimize the risk of contamination to the environment during ion exchanger processing, and to provide DOE with materials for near-term lab-bench stimulant testing, and eventual deployment. The proposed work will provide information on the structure/property relationship between ion exchanger frameworks and selectivity for specific ions, allowing for the eventual ''tuning'' of framework for specific ion exchange needs. To date, DOE sites have become interested in on-site testing of these materials; ongoing discussions and initial experiments are occurring with Dr. Dean Peterman, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (location of the DOE/EM Waste Treatment Focus Area), and Dr. John Harbour, Savannah River Site (SRS). Yet the materials have not been optimized, and further research and development of the novel ion exchangers and testing conditions with simulants are needed. In addition, studies of the ion exchanger composition versus ion selectivity, ion exchange capacity and durability of final waste form are needed. This program will bring together three key institutions to address scientific hurdles of the separation process associated with metal niobate and silicotitanate ion exchangers, in particular for divalent cations (e.g., Sr2+). The program involves a joint effort between researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who are leaders in structure/property relations in silicotitanates and in waste form development and performance assessment, Sandia National Laboratories, who discovered and developed crystalline silicotitanate ion exchangers (with Texas A&M and UOP) and also the novel class of divalent metal niobate ion exchangers, and the Thermochemistry Facility at UC Davis, who are world renowned experts in calorimetry and have already performed extensive thermodynamic studies on silicotitanate materials. In addition, Dr. Rodney Ewing of University of Michigan, an expert in radiation effects on materials, and Dr. Robert Roth of the National Institute of Standards and Technology and The Viper Group, a leader in phase equilibria development, will be consultants for radiation and phase studies. The research team will focus on three tasks that will provide both the basic research necessary for the development of highly selective ion exchange materials and also materials for short-term deployment within the DOE complex: (1) Structure/property relationships of a novel class of niobate-based molecular sieves (Na/Nb/M/O, M = transition metals), which show exceptionally high selectivity for divalent cations under extreme conditions (acid solutions, competing cations), (2) the role of ion exchanger structure change (both niobates and silicotitanates) on the exchange capacity (for elements such as Sr and actinide-surrogates) which results from exposure to DOE complex waste simulants, (3) thermodynamic stability of metal niobates and silicotitanate ion exchangers.

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22k pages

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INIS; OSTI as DE00820014

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  • Report No.: DOE/ER45674-4
  • Grant Number: FG07-97ER45674
  • DOI: 10.2172/820014 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 820014
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc739140

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  • December 5, 2003

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  • Oct. 18, 2015, 6:40 p.m.

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  • July 25, 2016, 6:44 p.m.

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Navrotsky, Alexandra; Balmer, Mary Lou; Nenoff, Tina M. & Su, Yali. New Metal Niobate and Silicotitanate Ion Exchangers: Development and Characterization, report, December 5, 2003; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc739140/: accessed September 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.