Accelerator-based validation of shielding codes

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The space radiation environment poses risks to astronaut health from a diverse set of sources, ranging from low-energy protons and electrons to highly-charged, high-energy atomic nuclei and their associated fragmentation products, including neutrons. The low-energy protons and electrons are the source of most of the radiation dose to Shuttle and ISS crews, while the more energetic particles that comprise the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (protons, He, and heavier nuclei up to Fe) will be the dominant source for crews on long-duration missions outside the earth's magnetic field. Because of this diversity of sources, a broad ground-based experimental effort is required to ... continued below

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Zeitlin, Cary; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Miller, Jack & Wilson, John W. August 12, 2002.

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Description

The space radiation environment poses risks to astronaut health from a diverse set of sources, ranging from low-energy protons and electrons to highly-charged, high-energy atomic nuclei and their associated fragmentation products, including neutrons. The low-energy protons and electrons are the source of most of the radiation dose to Shuttle and ISS crews, while the more energetic particles that comprise the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (protons, He, and heavier nuclei up to Fe) will be the dominant source for crews on long-duration missions outside the earth's magnetic field. Because of this diversity of sources, a broad ground-based experimental effort is required to validate the transport and shielding calculations used to predict doses and dose-equivalents under various mission scenarios. The experimental program of the LBNL group, described here, focuses principally on measurements of charged particle and neutron production in high-energy heavy-ion fragmentation. Other aspects of the program include measurements of the shielding provided by candidate spacesuit materials against low-energy protons (particularly relevant to extra-vehicular activities in low-earth orbit), and the depth-dose relations in tissue for higher-energy protons. The heavy-ion experiments are performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron and the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba in Japan. Proton experiments are performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88'' Cyclotron with a 55 MeV beam, and at the Loma Linda University Proton Facility with 100 to 250 MeV beam energies. The experimental results are an important component of the overall shielding program, as they allow for simple, well-controlled tests of the models developed to handle the more complex radiation environment in space.

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INIS; OSTI as DE00808927

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  • Space Radiation Shielding Technology Workshop, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (US), 04/03/2002--04/05/2002

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  • Report No.: LBNL--51264
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 808927
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc738858

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  • August 12, 2002

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 18, 2015, 6:40 p.m.

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  • Sept. 21, 2017, 6:57 p.m.

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Zeitlin, Cary; Heilbronn, Lawrence; Miller, Jack & Wilson, John W. Accelerator-based validation of shielding codes, article, August 12, 2002; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc738858/: accessed October 15, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.