High-tech buildings - Market transformation project

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Facility managers and designers know their buildings are energy intensive yet have few techniques to quantify cleanroom energy performance. Benchmarking identifies the energy end uses in a cleanroom. As expected, besides the process loads, which are often very intense, the mechanical systems are the most energy intensive in these buildings. Benchmarking the mechanical systems and components can provide useful information on system and component performance and provide a basis to identify energy-saving opportunities in cleanrooms. HVAC systems in cleanrooms are dramatically different from their counterparts in commercial buildings in terms of reliability, safety requirements, and scale. The design of cleanroom ... continued below

Physical Description

vp.

Creation Information

Team, Applications October 1, 2001.

Context

This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this report can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this report or its content.

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this report. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Facility managers and designers know their buildings are energy intensive yet have few techniques to quantify cleanroom energy performance. Benchmarking identifies the energy end uses in a cleanroom. As expected, besides the process loads, which are often very intense, the mechanical systems are the most energy intensive in these buildings. Benchmarking the mechanical systems and components can provide useful information on system and component performance and provide a basis to identify energy-saving opportunities in cleanrooms. HVAC systems in cleanrooms are dramatically different from their counterparts in commercial buildings in terms of reliability, safety requirements, and scale. The design of cleanroom HVAC systems is a specialty area requiring unique understanding of cleanliness guidelines, airflow quantities, room pressurization, code requirements, specialty equipment, tight control, and many more details. The HVAC systems must also operate reliably and safely. Since recirculation air systems use large amounts of fan power in moving large amounts of conditioned air through HEPA filters, the cleanroom, and return pathways they represent one of the largest energy end uses in a cleanroom. In addition, many processes requiring cleanrooms also have large make-up and exhaust airflow needs requiring huge amounts of energy to move and condition the displaced air. Energy intensity for mechanical systems in cleanrooms ranges between 4 to 100 times that of commercial buildings. There is, however, a lack of comparative data on the performance of cleanroom mechanical systems. To better understand existing cleanroom systems in high technology industries, and to better enable building owners, operators, and designers to compare energy use for a given cleanroom to others, it is necessary to benchmark energy performance in such facilities.

Physical Description

vp.

Notes

OSTI as DE00805117

Source

  • Other Information: PBD: 1 Oct 2001

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this report in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: LBNL--49112
  • Report No.: HT-457
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • DOI: 10.2172/805117 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 805117
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc738630

Collections

This report is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this report?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this report.

Creation Date

  • October 1, 2001

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 18, 2015, 6:40 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 4, 2016, 6:19 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this report last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 3

Interact With This Report

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Team, Applications. High-tech buildings - Market transformation project, report, October 1, 2001; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc738630/: accessed December 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.