A finite-difference frequency-domain code for electromagnetic induction tomography

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We are developing a new 3D code for application to electromagnetic induction tomography and applications to environmental imaging problems. We have used the finite-difference frequency- domain formulation of Beilenhoff et al. (1992) and the anisotropic PML (perfectly matched layer) approach (Berenger, 1994) to specify boundary conditions following Wu et al. (1997). PML deals with the fact that the computations must be done in a finite domain even though the real problem is effectively of infinite extent. The resulting formulas for the forward solver reduce to a problem of the form Ax = y, where A is a non-Hermitian matrix with ... continued below

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Sharpe, R M; Berryman, J G; Buettner, H M; Champagne, N J.,II & Grant, J B December 17, 1998.

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We are developing a new 3D code for application to electromagnetic induction tomography and applications to environmental imaging problems. We have used the finite-difference frequency- domain formulation of Beilenhoff et al. (1992) and the anisotropic PML (perfectly matched layer) approach (Berenger, 1994) to specify boundary conditions following Wu et al. (1997). PML deals with the fact that the computations must be done in a finite domain even though the real problem is effectively of infinite extent. The resulting formulas for the forward solver reduce to a problem of the form Ax = y, where A is a non-Hermitian matrix with real values off the diagonal and complex values along its diagonal. The matrix A may be either symmetric or nonsymmetric depending on details of the boundary conditions chosen (i.e., the particular PML used in the application). The basic equation must be solved for the vector x (which represents field quantities such as electric and magnetic fields) with the vector y determined by the boundary conditions and transmitter location. Of the many forward solvers that could be used for this system, relatively few have been thoroughly tested for the type of matrix encountered in our problem. Our studies of the stability characteristics of the Bi-CG algorithm raised questions about its reliability and uniform accuracy for this application. We have found the stability characteristics of Bi-CGSTAB [an alternative developed by van der Vorst (1992) for such problems] to be entirely adequate for our application, whereas the standard Bi-CG was quite inadequate. We have also done extensive validation of our code using semianalytical results as well as other codes. The new code is written in Fortran and is designed to be easily parallelized, but we have not yet tested this feature of the code. An adjoint method is being developed for solving the inverse problem for conductivity imaging (for mapping underground plumes), and this approach, when ready, will make repeated use of the current forward modeling code.

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877 Kilobytes

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  • Symposium on the Application of Geophysics to Engineering and Environmental Problems, Proceedings of the Environmental and Engineering Geophysical Society, Oakland, CA, March 14-18, 1999

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  • Other: DE00008163
  • Report No.: UCRL-JC-131590
  • Grant Number: W-7405-Eng-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 8163
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc738476

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  • December 17, 1998

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  • Oct. 18, 2015, 6:40 p.m.

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  • May 6, 2016, 9:55 p.m.

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Sharpe, R M; Berryman, J G; Buettner, H M; Champagne, N J.,II & Grant, J B. A finite-difference frequency-domain code for electromagnetic induction tomography, article, December 17, 1998; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc738476/: accessed October 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.