Renewal: Continential lithosphere evolution as a function of tectonic environment

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Description

The Cenozoic tectonic environment and stress regime of the southwestern United States have changed dramatically from compression during shallow-angle subduction during the Laramide orogeny in the early Cenozoic to the current mode of Basin and Range extension. Questions remain unresolved concerning the causes of this transition, including the timing of the initiation of extension (estimates range from 36 to 25 Ma), and is the Basin and Range simply an mega-example of back-arc extension, or is extension related to the subduction of an oceanic spreading center about 30 Ma? We have examined the patterns of magmagenesis and geochemical composition through Cenozoic ... continued below

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6 p.

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McMillan, N.J. & Baldridge, W.S. June 1, 1995.

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  • McMillan, N.J. New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences
  • Baldridge, W.S. Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

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Description

The Cenozoic tectonic environment and stress regime of the southwestern United States have changed dramatically from compression during shallow-angle subduction during the Laramide orogeny in the early Cenozoic to the current mode of Basin and Range extension. Questions remain unresolved concerning the causes of this transition, including the timing of the initiation of extension (estimates range from 36 to 25 Ma), and is the Basin and Range simply an mega-example of back-arc extension, or is extension related to the subduction of an oceanic spreading center about 30 Ma? We have examined the patterns of magmagenesis and geochemical composition through Cenozoic time in southern New Mexico. We have defined four magma sources that have contributed to Cenozoic magmas. Immediately following the Laramide, magmas contain substantial contributions from the lower crust. Mid-Tertiary extension is related to the eruption of rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs and basalts. The basalts were generated by melting of the lithospheric mantle; intercalated rhyolites have a strong upper crustal signature. Eruption of basalts and andesites with sources in the lithospheric mantle and lower crust continued for several million years after rhyolitic volcanism ceased. The region was nearly void of volcanic activity for 16 million years despite continued extension, but at 10 Ma, basalts derived from the asthenosphere began to erupt.

Physical Description

6 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE95012958

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  • Other Information: PBD: [1995]

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  • Other: DE95012958
  • Report No.: LA-SUB--95-62
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • DOI: 10.2172/81086 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 81086
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc738274

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  • June 1, 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 18, 2015, 6:40 p.m.

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  • July 28, 2016, 7:24 p.m.

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McMillan, N.J. & Baldridge, W.S. Renewal: Continential lithosphere evolution as a function of tectonic environment, report, June 1, 1995; New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc738274/: accessed October 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.