Development of high Sensitivity Materials for Applications in Magneto-Mechanical Torque Sensor

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The Matteucci effect, which mainly manifests itself as the change of magnetization of a material with torsional stress, is currently of great technological interest because of the search for magnetic torque sensors. Magnetic torque sensors are important to future improvements of automobiles and industrial robots. It is well known that the magnetic state of a material depends on both the external magnetic field and external stress which causes strain and change in magnetization of the material. The former phenomenon has been well understood in both theory and application. However, the magnetic state dependence of stress is not adequately understood and ... continued below

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1454 Kilobytes pages

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Shen, Yuping August 5, 2003.

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The Matteucci effect, which mainly manifests itself as the change of magnetization of a material with torsional stress, is currently of great technological interest because of the search for magnetic torque sensors. Magnetic torque sensors are important to future improvements of automobiles and industrial robots. It is well known that the magnetic state of a material depends on both the external magnetic field and external stress which causes strain and change in magnetization of the material. The former phenomenon has been well understood in both theory and application. However, the magnetic state dependence of stress is not adequately understood and the experimental data is of limited extent. In this project, the Matteucci effect in iron, cobalt, nickel and permalloy rods has been documented when they were in magnetic remanence status along the axis and nickel ring when they were in remanence status along the circumference. The effect of annealing on the magnetomechanical effect in nickel and the temperature dependence of the magnetomechanical sensitivity has also been examined. Factors related to the sensitivity at equilibrium condition have been theoretically developed. it is found in the experiments that the mechanism of magnetic domain wall movement plays an important role rather than the domain rotation. A higher sensitivity was found by domain wall movement mechanism than that by domain rotation mechanism. However, the domain wall movement will result in more hysteresis than domain wall rotation. The dynamic process of Matteucci effect of iron, cobalt, permally, especially as-fabricated and annealed nickel rods have been examined. A tentative explanation for the difference of these in terms of magnetic domain configuration and domain wall movement was given. As a result, another method of configuring and processing magnetic domains to get a linear magnetomechanical response other than that suggested by Garshelis, which was the basic method before the present studies, has been experimentally developed and theoretically analyzed. A higher sensitivity was obtained in nickel by employing this method than that by employing the method of Garshelis. The results suggest that magnetic domain configuration is very important in designing a high sensitivity magnetic torque sensor.

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1454 Kilobytes pages

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OSTI as DE00816441

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  • Other Information: TH: Thesis (M.S.); Submitted to Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (US)

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  • Report No.: IS-T 2296
  • Grant Number: W-7405-Eng-82
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 816441
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc738038

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  • August 5, 2003

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  • Oct. 18, 2015, 6:40 p.m.

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  • Jan. 2, 2018, 3:48 p.m.

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Shen, Yuping. Development of high Sensitivity Materials for Applications in Magneto-Mechanical Torque Sensor, thesis or dissertation, August 5, 2003; Iowa. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc738038/: accessed October 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.