Downstream Impacts of Tank 48H In-tank and Out-of-tank Processing Alternatives

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This document discusses a number of possible impacts that an in-tank or out-of-tank process may have on downstream processing facilities. The analysis is part of a task to develop processes to destroy tetraphenylborate using Fenton Chemistry (metal catalyst plus hydrogen peroxide). Two processes being evaluated are funded by a grant from DOE's National Energy Technology Center. The first is an in-tank process, where the tetraphenylborate is destroyed by decreasing the pH, increasing the temperature and adding a catalyst and hydrogen peroxide as required. After the TPB is destroyed, sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrite are added to the tank to return ... continued below

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Lambert, D.P. December 22, 2003.

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This document discusses a number of possible impacts that an in-tank or out-of-tank process may have on downstream processing facilities. The analysis is part of a task to develop processes to destroy tetraphenylborate using Fenton Chemistry (metal catalyst plus hydrogen peroxide). Two processes being evaluated are funded by a grant from DOE's National Energy Technology Center. The first is an in-tank process, where the tetraphenylborate is destroyed by decreasing the pH, increasing the temperature and adding a catalyst and hydrogen peroxide as required. After the TPB is destroyed, sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrite are added to the tank to return the tank to conditions that minimize corrosion. The resulting slurry is stored in a HLW tank, likely concentrated in the HLW evaporators, and later will be fed to the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The second process is an out-of-tank Fenton process. This process produces two streams, a high cesium stream that feeds to DWPF and a low cesium feed that returns to a HLW tank with the DWPF recycle. The recycle stream may be evaporated in the HLW evaporators, and will later be fed to the Saltstone Facility or the Actinide Removal Process. An additional two processes being evaluated are in-tank processes. In the first, thermal hydrolysis, the TPB is destroyed by decreasing the pH and increasing the temperature. In the second process, thermal hydrolysis, the TPB is destroyed in by decreasing the pH, adding a catalyst, and increasing the temperature. After the TPB is destroyed, sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrite are added to the tank to return the tank to conditions that minimize corrosion. The resulting slurry is stored in a HLW tank, will likely be concentrated in the HLW evaporators and later will be fed to the Salt Waste Processing Facility. This evaluation is designed to identify possible downstream impacts that may limit the productivity or quality of existing and proposed processing facilities, including the Salt Waste Processing Facility, Defense Waste Processing Facility, Actinide Removal Process, Tank Farms, Saltstone Facility, or the HLW evaporators. This list was compiled so that researchers and modelers could target their future work to determine whether these postulated interactions will truly impact the downstream facilities. summarizes the possible downstream impacts noted in this document, and attempts to compare the processing alternatives.

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  • Other Information: PBD: 22 Dec 2003

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  • Report No.: WSRC-RP-2003-00588
  • Grant Number: AC09-96SR18500
  • DOI: 10.2172/820576 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 820576
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc737777

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  • December 22, 2003

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  • Oct. 18, 2015, 6:40 p.m.

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  • May 5, 2016, 5:43 p.m.

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Lambert, D.P. Downstream Impacts of Tank 48H In-tank and Out-of-tank Processing Alternatives, report, December 22, 2003; South Carolina. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc737777/: accessed October 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.