Sorption of Arsenic from Drinking Water to Mg(OH)2 Sorrel's Cements, and Zirconium Doped Materials

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It was discovered that MgO or Mg(OH){sub 2} when it reacts with water is a very strong sorbent for arsenic. Distribution constants, or K{sub d} values, are as high as 1 x 10{sup 6} L/mole. In this work, Mg(OH){sub 2} and other compounds have been investigated as sorbents for arsenic and other contaminants. This work has resulted in several major accomplishments including: (1) design, construction, and testing of a pressure sand filter to remove Mg(OH){sub 2} after it has sorbed arsenic from water, (2) stabilization of Mg(OH){sub 2} as a Sorrel's cement against reaction with carbonate that results in MgCO{sub ... continued below

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25 pages

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MOORE, ROBERT C.; ZHAO, HONGTING; SANCHEZ, CHARLES ANTHONY; HOLT, KATHLEEN C.; SALAS, FRED; HASAN, AHMED ALI MOHAMED et al. November 1, 2002.

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  • Sandia National Laboratories
    Publisher Info: Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM, and Livermore, CA (United States)
    Place of Publication: Albuquerque, New Mexico

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It was discovered that MgO or Mg(OH){sub 2} when it reacts with water is a very strong sorbent for arsenic. Distribution constants, or K{sub d} values, are as high as 1 x 10{sup 6} L/mole. In this work, Mg(OH){sub 2} and other compounds have been investigated as sorbents for arsenic and other contaminants. This work has resulted in several major accomplishments including: (1) design, construction, and testing of a pressure sand filter to remove Mg(OH){sub 2} after it has sorbed arsenic from water, (2) stabilization of Mg(OH){sub 2} as a Sorrel's cement against reaction with carbonate that results in MgCO{sub 3} formation decreasing the efficiency of Mg(OH){sub 2} to sorb arsenic, and (3) the development of a new, very promising sorbent for arsenic based on zirconium. Zirconium is an environmentally benign material found in many common products such as toothpaste. It is currently used in water treatment and is very inexpensive. In this work, zirconium has been bonded to activated carbon, zeolites, sand and montmorillonite. Because of its high charge in ionic form (+6), zirconium is a strong sorbent for many anions including arsenic. In equilibrium experiments arsenic concentrations in water were reduced from 200 ppb to less than 1 ppb in less than 1 minute of contact time. Additionally, analytical methods for detecting arsenic in water have also been investigated. Various analytical techniques including HPLC, AA and ICP-MS are used for quantification of arsenic. Due to large matrix interferences HPLC and AA techniques are not very selective and are time consuming. ICP-MS is highly efficient, requires a low sample volume and has a high tolerance for interferences. All these techniques are costly and require trained staff, and with the exception of ICP-MS, these methods cannot be used at low ppb arsenic concentration without using a pre-concentration step. An alternative to these traditional techniques is to use a colorimetric method based on leucocrystal violet dye interaction with iodine. This method has been adapted in our facility for quantifying arsenic concentrations down to 14 ppb.

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25 pages

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  • Other Information: PBD: 1 Nov 2002

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  • Report No.: SAND2002-3641
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • DOI: 10.2172/807054 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 807054
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc737595

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • November 1, 2002

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 18, 2015, 6:40 p.m.

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  • April 12, 2016, 5:11 p.m.

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MOORE, ROBERT C.; ZHAO, HONGTING; SANCHEZ, CHARLES ANTHONY; HOLT, KATHLEEN C.; SALAS, FRED; HASAN, AHMED ALI MOHAMED et al. Sorption of Arsenic from Drinking Water to Mg(OH)2 Sorrel's Cements, and Zirconium Doped Materials, report, November 1, 2002; Albuquerque, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc737595/: accessed December 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.