Applied and Environmental Microbiology Gordon Research Conference

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The main objective of the Gordon Research Conference on Applied and Environmental Microbiology was to present and discuss new, fundamental research findings on microorganisms, their activities in the environment, their ecosystem-level effects, and their environmental or commercial applications. To accomplish this goal, knowledge of microbial diversity, interactions and population dynamics was required. The genomic basis of microbial processes, the cycling of naturally occurring and hazardous substances, and methodologies to assess the functional relationships of microorganisms in their habitats were essential for understanding the ecological consequences of microbial activities and the formulation of generalizing principles. In the last decade, molecular technology ... continued below

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16 pages

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Wall, Judy D. November 19, 2003.

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Description

The main objective of the Gordon Research Conference on Applied and Environmental Microbiology was to present and discuss new, fundamental research findings on microorganisms, their activities in the environment, their ecosystem-level effects, and their environmental or commercial applications. To accomplish this goal, knowledge of microbial diversity, interactions and population dynamics was required. The genomic basis of microbial processes, the cycling of naturally occurring and hazardous substances, and methodologies to assess the functional relationships of microorganisms in their habitats were essential for understanding the ecological consequences of microbial activities and the formulation of generalizing principles. In the last decade, molecular technology has revealed that microbial diversity is far more extensive than the limited view obtained from culturing procedures. Great advances in environmental microbiology have resulted from the development and application of molecular approaches to ecology and molecular evolution. A further surprise resulting from the application of these new tools is the blurring of the distinction between pathogenic traits versus those considered non-pathogenic. This year's conference addressed the issues of biodiversity, its development, and the impact of stress on gene selection and expression. In addition microbial metabolic versatility with toxins such as heavy metals, antibiotics, and organic pollutants were discussed. The nine session topics were (1) biodiversity and the bacterial species, (2) mechanisms of biodiversification, (3) biofilms in health and environment, (4) a genomic view of microbial response to stress, (5) microbial use of toxic metals, (6) microbial mineral formation and dissolution, (7) power and limitations of antimicrobials, (8) biodegradation of organic pollutants, and (9) astrobiology. The Conference had an international profile: the Conference Vice-Chair, Dr. Gerard Muyzer, was from The Nether lands, 10 of the 28 speakers and 2 of the 9 discussion leaders were from outside the USA. The program was composed of speakers and discussion leaders (selected through open peer discussion) from a wide range of universities, institutes, government laboratories, and industries. The Conference has traditionally drawn many non-U.S. conferees. In typical Gordon Conference style, the Conference sessions were informal, off the record, and open to all participants for the expression of their views. Meetings were held in the morning and evening. Afternoons were available for participation in small, informal discussion groups. The latest and often unpublished findings were emphasized. Following each evening session, conferees were able to gather in a central location where additional discussion occurred. Poster sessions facilitated informal discussion in the afternoon and evenings. The entire atmosphere of the Conference was designed to foster informal interaction. In fact, publication of a proceedings was not permitted by the Gordon Conferences in order to promote discussion of unpublished data. This type of meeting is a valuable means of disseminating information and ideas in a way that cannot be achieved through the usual channels of publication and presentations at large scientific meetings. The primary criteria for admittance to this Conference were scientific commitment and, implicitly, an interest in active and meaningful participation in the discussions.

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16 pages

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OSTI as DE00818928

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  • Applied and Environmental Microbiology Gordon Research Conference Connecticut College, New London, CT (US), 07/27/2003--08/01/2003

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  • Report No.: DOE ER63553-1
  • Grant Number: FG02-03ER63553
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 818928
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc737589

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  • November 19, 2003

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 18, 2015, 6:40 p.m.

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  • Aug. 10, 2016, 1:07 p.m.

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Wall, Judy D. Applied and Environmental Microbiology Gordon Research Conference, article, November 19, 2003; West Kingston, Rhode Island. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc737589/: accessed September 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.