Novel Approaches to Surface Analysis and Materials Engineering Using Highly Charged Ions

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Complex problems in materials science require very sensitive, high spatial resolution (< 100 nm) determination of chemical (molecular) structures in near-surface volumes. Slow, highly charged ions (HCIs) provide a new, unique tool for probing chemical structure on a nanometer scale. The authors have explored the potential of these new highly charged ion based techniques in studies of materials with programmatic significance such as high explosives and actinide surfaces. Specifically the are studying HCI based surface analysis techniques (such as secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS) that are capable of achieving sensitivity of less than 10{sup 9} atoms/cm{sup 2}. In addition, this ... continued below

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153 Kilobytes pages

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Hamza, A.; Schenkel, T.; Barnes, A. & Schneider, D. February 2, 2000.

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Complex problems in materials science require very sensitive, high spatial resolution (< 100 nm) determination of chemical (molecular) structures in near-surface volumes. Slow, highly charged ions (HCIs) provide a new, unique tool for probing chemical structure on a nanometer scale. The authors have explored the potential of these new highly charged ion based techniques in studies of materials with programmatic significance such as high explosives and actinide surfaces. Specifically the are studying HCI based surface analysis techniques (such as secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS) that are capable of achieving sensitivity of less than 10{sup 9} atoms/cm{sup 2}. In addition, this technique can determine chemical structure and hydrogen concentration. These attributes make this technique especially important to Laboratory missions in enhanced surveillance and nonproliferation. The unique advantage of HCIs over singly charged ions is the extreme energy density that is deposited into a nanometer-sized near-surface volume at the impact of a single HCI. For example, a Au{sup 69+} ion deposits about 0.5 MJ/cm{sup 3}. This high energy density causes the emission of a large number of secondary particles (electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and clusters) from surfaces. The emitted particles act as probes of the energy dissipation mechanism, and their yields are of technological significance. The HCI-emission microscope concept they developed uniquely combines all three aspects, high spatial resolution with highly sensitive compositional analysis and chemical structure determination. The experiments have shown that individual HCI impacts lead to copious electron emission, over 200 electrons per incident highly charged ion. In addition, highly charged ion induced secondary ion mass spectrometry (HCI-SIMS) provides considerably more information per ion impact than conventional SIMS. Combining these two phenomena provides a unique tool to study important materials issues necessary for the laboratory to accomplish its missions.

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153 Kilobytes pages

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  • Other Information: PBD: 2 Feb 2000

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  • Report No.: UCRL-ID-137449
  • Grant Number: W-7405-Eng-48
  • DOI: 10.2172/792619 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 792619
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc737338

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  • February 2, 2000

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 19, 2015, 7:39 p.m.

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  • May 6, 2016, 3:37 p.m.

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Hamza, A.; Schenkel, T.; Barnes, A. & Schneider, D. Novel Approaches to Surface Analysis and Materials Engineering Using Highly Charged Ions, report, February 2, 2000; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc737338/: accessed September 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.