The integration of engineering and architecture: A perspective on natural ventilation for the new San Francisco Federal Building

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A description of the in-progress design of a new Federal Office Building for San Francisco is used to illustrate a number of issues arising in the design of large, naturally ventilated office buildings. These issues include the need for an integrated approach to design involving the architects, mechanical and structural engineers, lighting designers and specialist simulation modelers. In particular, the use of natural ventilation, and the avoidance of air-conditioning, depends on the high degree of exposed thermal mass made possible by the structural scheme and by the minimization of solar heat gains while maintaining the good daylighting that results from ... continued below

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15 pages

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McConahey, Erin; Haves, Philip & Christ, Tim May 31, 2002.

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Description

A description of the in-progress design of a new Federal Office Building for San Francisco is used to illustrate a number of issues arising in the design of large, naturally ventilated office buildings. These issues include the need for an integrated approach to design involving the architects, mechanical and structural engineers, lighting designers and specialist simulation modelers. In particular, the use of natural ventilation, and the avoidance of air-conditioning, depends on the high degree of exposed thermal mass made possible by the structural scheme and by the minimization of solar heat gains while maintaining the good daylighting that results from optimization of the fagade. Another issue was the need for a radical change in interior space planning in order to enhance the natural ventilation; all the individual enclosed offices are located along the central spine of each floorplate rather than at the perimeter. The role of integration in deterring the undermining of the design through value engineering is discussed. The comfort criteria for the building were established based on the recent extension to the ASHRAE comfort standard based on the adaptive model for naturally ventilated buildings. The building energy simulation program EnergyPlus was used to compare the performance of different natural ventilation strategies. The results indicate that, in the San Francisco climate, wind-driven ventilation provides sufficient nocturnal cooling to maintain comfortable conditions and that external chimneys do not provide significant additional ventilation at times when it when it would be beneficial.

Physical Description

15 pages

Notes

INIS; OSTI as DE00806118

Source

  • 2002 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Pacific Grove, CA (US), 08/18/2002--08/23/2002

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  • Report No.: LBNL--51134
  • Report No.: DR-453
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 806118
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc736473

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • May 31, 2002

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 18, 2015, 6:40 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 4, 2016, 4:18 p.m.

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McConahey, Erin; Haves, Philip & Christ, Tim. The integration of engineering and architecture: A perspective on natural ventilation for the new San Francisco Federal Building, article, May 31, 2002; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc736473/: accessed September 22, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.