Creating science-driven computer architecture: A new patch to scientific leadership

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We believe that it is critical for the future of high end computing in the United States to bring into existence a new class of computational capability that is optimal for science. In recent years scientific computing has increasingly become dependent on hardware that is designed and optimized for commercial applications. Science in this country has greatly benefited from the improvements in computers that derive from advances in microprocessors following Moore's Law, and a strategy of relying on machines optimized primarily for business applications. However within the last several years, in part because of the challenge presented by the appearance ... continued below

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6 pages

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Simon, Horst D.; McCurdy, C. William; Kramer, T.C.; Stevens, Rick; McCoy,Mike; Seager, Mark et al. May 16, 2003.

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Description

We believe that it is critical for the future of high end computing in the United States to bring into existence a new class of computational capability that is optimal for science. In recent years scientific computing has increasingly become dependent on hardware that is designed and optimized for commercial applications. Science in this country has greatly benefited from the improvements in computers that derive from advances in microprocessors following Moore's Law, and a strategy of relying on machines optimized primarily for business applications. However within the last several years, in part because of the challenge presented by the appearance of the Japanese Earth Simulator, the sense has been growing in the scientific community that a new strategy is needed. A more aggressive strategy than reliance only on market forces driven by business applications is necessary in order to achieve a better alignment between the needs of scientific computing and the platforms available. The United States should undertake a program that will result in scientific computing capability that durably returns the advantage to American science, because doing so is crucial to the country's future. Such a strategy must also be sustainable. New classes of computer designs will not only revolutionize the power of supercomputing for science, but will also affect scientific computing at all scales. What is called for is the opening of a new frontier of scientific capability that will ensure that American science is greatly enabled in its pursuit of research in critical areas such as nanoscience, climate prediction, combustion, modeling in the life sciences, and fusion energy, as well as in meeting essential needs for national security. In this white paper we propose a strategy for accomplishing this mission, pursuing different directions of hardware development and deployment, and establishing a highly capable networking and grid infrastructure connecting these platforms to the broad research community.

Physical Description

6 pages

Notes

OSTI as DE00813387

Source

  • Other Information: PBD: 16 May 2003

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  • Report No.: LBNL--52713
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • DOI: 10.2172/813387 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 813387
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc735094

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • May 16, 2003

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 18, 2015, 6:40 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 4, 2016, 12:34 p.m.

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Simon, Horst D.; McCurdy, C. William; Kramer, T.C.; Stevens, Rick; McCoy,Mike; Seager, Mark et al. Creating science-driven computer architecture: A new patch to scientific leadership, report, May 16, 2003; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc735094/: accessed November 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.