Laser: a Tool for Optimization and Enhancement of Analytical Methods

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In this work, we use lasers to enhance possibilities of laser desorption methods and to optimize coating procedure for capillary electrophoresis (CE). We use several different instrumental arrangements to characterize matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD) at atmospheric pressure and in vacuum. In imaging mode, 488-nm argon-ion laser beam is deflected by two acousto-optic deflectors to scan plumes desorbed at atmospheric pressure via absorption. All absorbing species, including neutral molecules, are monitored. Interesting features, e.g. differences between the initial plume and subsequent plumes desorbed from the same spot, or the formation of two plumes from one laser shot are observed. Total plume ... continued below

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Medium: P; Size: 148 pages

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Preisler, Jan January 1, 1997.

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Description

In this work, we use lasers to enhance possibilities of laser desorption methods and to optimize coating procedure for capillary electrophoresis (CE). We use several different instrumental arrangements to characterize matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD) at atmospheric pressure and in vacuum. In imaging mode, 488-nm argon-ion laser beam is deflected by two acousto-optic deflectors to scan plumes desorbed at atmospheric pressure via absorption. All absorbing species, including neutral molecules, are monitored. Interesting features, e.g. differences between the initial plume and subsequent plumes desorbed from the same spot, or the formation of two plumes from one laser shot are observed. Total plume absorbance can be correlated with the acoustic signal generated by the desorption event. A model equation for the plume velocity as a function of time is proposed. Alternatively, the use of a static laser beam for observation enables reliable determination of plume velocities even when they are very high. Static scattering detection reveals negative influence of particle spallation on MS signal. Ion formation during MALD was monitored using 193-nm light to photodissociate a portion of insulin ion plume. These results define the optimal conditions for desorbing analytes from matrices, as opposed to achieving a compromise between efficient desorption and efficient ionization as is practiced in mass spectrometry. In CE experiment, we examined changes in a poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) coating by continuously monitoring the electroosmotic flow (EOF) in a fused-silica capillary during electrophoresis. An imaging CCD camera was used to follow the motion of a fluorescent neutral marker zone along the length of the capillary excited by 488-nm Ar-ion laser. The PEO coating was shown to reduce the velocity of EOF by more than an order of magnitude compared to a bare capillary at pH 7.0. The coating protocol was important, especially at an intermediate pH of 7.7. The increase of pH in the cathodic (detection-end) buffer reservoir beyond pH {approx}8.0, e.g. as a result of electrolysis, had a large impact on the stability of the coating. This phenomenon may be used for the efficient and reliable fast regeneration of the column surface.

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Medium: P; Size: 148 pages

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OSTI as DE00793817

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  • Other Information: TH: Thesis (Ph.D.); Submitted to Iowa State University, Ames, IA (US)

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  • Report No.: IS-T-1800
  • Grant Number: W-7405-Eng-82
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 793817
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc735033

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • January 1, 1997

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  • Oct. 19, 2015, 7:39 p.m.

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  • March 30, 2016, 12:54 p.m.

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Preisler, Jan. Laser: a Tool for Optimization and Enhancement of Analytical Methods, thesis or dissertation, January 1, 1997; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc735033/: accessed November 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.