Project Management - The People Make the Difference

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. manages the high level nuclear waste tanks for the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection, at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford tanks contain more than 53 million gallons of waste, 200 million curies (three times that released by Chernobyl), and 67 of the 177 tanks have leaked at some time in the past. The current company has been responsible for the tanks since fall 1996. Previous to 1996, there is a long history of the Hanford tank farms being the bane of DOE Environmental Management. One tank would periodically and ... continued below

Physical Description

12 pages

Creation Information

Delozier, M. P. January 15, 2001.

Context

This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this report can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this report or its content.

Sponsor

Publishers

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this report. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. manages the high level nuclear waste tanks for the Department of Energy's Office of River Protection, at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford tanks contain more than 53 million gallons of waste, 200 million curies (three times that released by Chernobyl), and 67 of the 177 tanks have leaked at some time in the past. The current company has been responsible for the tanks since fall 1996. Previous to 1996, there is a long history of the Hanford tank farms being the bane of DOE Environmental Management. One tank would periodically and spontaneously release large quantities of flammable gas. Another tank, which does not have double containment as now required by law, self-boiled and required the addition of more than 5,000 gallons of water per month to maintain temperatures within the design parameters of the tank. Only a single-wall steel pipe with limited leak detection was available to transfer waste the 7-mile route from the western-most tank farms to a waste evaporator. The regulators, public, and congress had little confidence that DOE or its contractors knew the chemical, physical, or nuclear characteristics of the tanks contents. The nuclear safety controls were so complex and varied for different tanks and different operations, that very few employees understood the hazards and the control requirements. In fact, in 1993, congress found it necessary to pass a law restricting the operations of 54 of the 177 tanks due to safety concerns--these tanks are known as ''watch list'' tanks. This was a bleak picture--DOE's most hazardous nuclear waste storage site--and no one really knew what was in the tanks and control measures were akin to bandaids and bailing wire. This is not the condition today. No tanks spontaneously belch gas above the flammability limit of hydrogen. All tanks have consistent flammable gas controls that are understood by the tank farm workers. A new doubly contained transfer line, with redundant leak detection systems, routinely transports waste across the 7 miles from the west to east tanks. The high-heat tank has been emptied. A new ventilation system services the doubly contained tanks with the highest heat content. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, a presidential appointed group that oversees DOE nuclear safety, has declared that the tank contents are sufficiently characterized. The systems and a plan are in place to remove residual pumpable liquids from the non-compliant single-shell tanks by 2004. More than half of the tanks have been removed from the ''watch list'' and the rest will be removed within the next year. And, a comprehensive plan exists to retrieve the waste, send it to a treatment plant, and close the tank farms.

Physical Description

12 pages

Source

  • Other Information: PBD: 15 Jan 2001

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this report in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: CHG-7590, Rev.0
  • Grant Number: AC27-99RL14047
  • DOI: 10.2172/804930 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 804930
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc734277

Collections

This report is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

What responsibilities do I have when using this report?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this report.

Creation Date

  • January 15, 2001

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 18, 2015, 6:40 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 21, 2016, 3:50 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this report last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 3

Interact With This Report

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Delozier, M. P. Project Management - The People Make the Difference, report, January 15, 2001; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc734277/: accessed September 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.