Development of In Vitro Systems for Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) - Final Report for 1992 to 2002

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Our project began on July 1, 1992, with the objective of developing systems that could be used in biotechnological approaches to switchgrass improvement. Within six months after initiation of the project, we had worked out protocols in which plants could be regenerated from callus cultures through both organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis. Documentation for both modes of regeneration was provided in our progress reports and in publications. One thousand regenerated plants were established in the field during the first year. We found that Alamo (lowland type) was much more amenable to in vitro culture, and plants could be regenerated much more ... continued below

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55 pages

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Conger, B.V. January 16, 2003.

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Description

Our project began on July 1, 1992, with the objective of developing systems that could be used in biotechnological approaches to switchgrass improvement. Within six months after initiation of the project, we had worked out protocols in which plants could be regenerated from callus cultures through both organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis. Documentation for both modes of regeneration was provided in our progress reports and in publications. One thousand regenerated plants were established in the field during the first year. We found that Alamo (lowland type) was much more amenable to in vitro culture, and plants could be regenerated much more easily than from Cave-in-Rock (upland type). During the first three years of the project, we studied the influence of genotype, culture medium components, explant type, etc., on regeneration. As mentioned, we found that the lowland cultivars Alamo and Kanlow were much easier to regenerate than upland cultivars, such as Trailblazer, Blackwell, and Cave-in-Rock. For callus induction, we initially used mature caryopses, young leaf tissue, and portions of seedlings. We were successful in inducing callus and regenerating plants from all explants. Two other systems developed during the 4th to 6th year period of the project included multiple shoot formation initiated from germinated seedlings and regenerable suspension cultures. The latter were initiated from embryogenic calluses produced from in vitro developed inflorescences. An important factor for producing multiple shoots was the presence of thidiazuron in the medium. The shoots could be easily rooted and numerous plantlets produced. The last 3 to 4 years of the project focused on anther and microspore culture experiments to produce haploid plants and on genetic transformation. Although thousands of putative haploid plants were produced from a few anthers, they were very weak and difficult to keep alive. Chromosome counts revealed the gametic number in cells where it was possible to count chromosomes. The isolated microspore culture experiments were not successful.

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55 pages

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  • Other Information: PBD: 16 Jan 2003

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  • Report No.: ORNL/SUB-02-11XSY161/01
  • Grant Number: AC05-00OR22725
  • DOI: 10.2172/814267 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 814267
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc734085

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  • January 16, 2003

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  • Oct. 18, 2015, 6:40 p.m.

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  • March 30, 2016, 8:19 p.m.

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Conger, B.V. Development of In Vitro Systems for Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) - Final Report for 1992 to 2002, report, January 16, 2003; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc734085/: accessed November 20, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.