Trading of locomotive NO{sub x} emissions : a potential success story.

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New US Environmental Protection Agency regulations are forcing locomotive manufacturers and railroads to reduce pollutant emissions from locomotive operation. All new locomotives must meet strict standards when they are built, and existing locomotives must comply when they are rebuilt. Emissions can be reduced either by adjusting combustion parameters, which incurs a fuel penalty, or by turning the diesel engine off when the train is not moving and would otherwise be idling. The latter reduces fuel consumption, but requires installation of a device--such as an auxiliary power unit (APU)--to ensure that the engine can be restarted in cold weather and to ... continued below

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11 pages

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Gaines, L. L.; Biess, L. J. & Diedrich, G. K. April 26, 2002.

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Description

New US Environmental Protection Agency regulations are forcing locomotive manufacturers and railroads to reduce pollutant emissions from locomotive operation. All new locomotives must meet strict standards when they are built, and existing locomotives must comply when they are rebuilt. Emissions can be reduced either by adjusting combustion parameters, which incurs a fuel penalty, or by turning the diesel engine off when the train is not moving and would otherwise be idling. The latter reduces fuel consumption, but requires installation of a device--such as an auxiliary power unit (APU)--to ensure that the engine can be restarted in cold weather and to supply hotel loads for the crew. Without a financial incentive, capital-short railroads will opt to achieve compliance in the least costly way. However, if they have the option of selling emissions credits from reducing emissions below regulated levels, it would be in their best interest to install additional equipment to minimize emissions. These credits could be purchased by businesses with compliance costs greater than either the cost of the credits or the fines they would have had to pay for non-compliance. The result is a financial benefit for both parties, and a net reduction in emissions, because the seller is emitting below regulated levels, and the buyer is no longer non-compliant. This paper describes a railroad as the potential seller, unable to consummate trades because of uncertainty in the regulatory environment, and estimates financial benefits and reductions in emissions and energy use that could be achieved if the barrier could be removed.

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11 pages

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  • Air and Waste Management Association 95th Annual Conference and Exposition, Baltimore, MD (US), 06/23/2002--06/27/2002

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  • Report No.: ANL/ES/CP-107519
  • Grant Number: W-31-109-ENG-38
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 795841
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc733973

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • April 26, 2002

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 19, 2015, 7:39 p.m.

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  • March 28, 2016, 11:22 p.m.

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Gaines, L. L.; Biess, L. J. & Diedrich, G. K. Trading of locomotive NO{sub x} emissions : a potential success story., article, April 26, 2002; Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc733973/: accessed December 12, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.