Assessment of the Need for Relief Services by Rural Texas Family Physicians

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Article on an assessment of the need for relief services by rural Texas family physicians.

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15 p.

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Friedlander, Leslie; Hockenberger, Maureen & Eve, Susan Brown 1995.

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Article on an assessment of the need for relief services by rural Texas family physicians.

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15 p.

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Abstract: Rural physicians must be away from their practice on occasion, whether to pursue continuing medical education, because of illness or other personal business, or to take a vacation. Yet many rural physicians find it difficult to leave their practice. This difficulty is cited anecdotally by rural physicians as one of the disadvantages to practicing medicine in a rural setting. Obtaining temporary coverage, or relief services, for their practice is problematic. Their inability to leave a practice temporarily, as needed, contributes to their sense of professional isolation and to long hours and job pressures, factors often contributing to a physician's decision to reject rural medical practice. Because rural Texas has such a severe shortage of medical and health care personnel, an issue like relief services, that may affect recruitment and retention of these professionals, is of critical concern. The 196 nonmetropolitan counties in Texas are home to 15.8 percent of the state's federally designated Health Professional Shortage Areas (TDH, 1994). Over 75 percent of Texas' federally designated Medically Underserved Areas or Populations -- another measure of health service shortages -- are located in the state's nonmetropolitan counties (TDH, 1994).

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  • Texas Journal of Rural Health, 1995, Lubbock: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, pp. 1-15

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  • Publication Title: Texas Journal of Rural Health
  • Page Start: 1
  • Page End: 15
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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  • 1995

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  • Oct. 2, 2015, 9:40 a.m.

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Friedlander, Leslie; Hockenberger, Maureen & Eve, Susan Brown. Assessment of the Need for Relief Services by Rural Texas Family Physicians, article, 1995; [Lubbock, Texas]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc725828/: accessed November 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service.