The Migration and Entrapment of DNAPLs in Physically and Chemically Heterogeneous Porous Media - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/15/2000

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Hazardous dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), such as chlorinated solvents, are slightly water soluble and pose a serious threat to soil and groundwater supplies in many portions of the United States. The migration and entrapment of DNAPLs in the subsurface environment is typically believed to be controlled by physical heterogeneities; i.e, layers and lenses of contrasting soil texture. The rationale for this assumption is that capillarity, as determined by the soil texture, is the dominant transport mechanism. Capillarity also depends on interfacial tension and medium wettability. Interfacial tension and medium wettability may be spatially and temporally dependent due to variations ... continued below

Physical Description

vp.

Creation Information

Abriola, L. M. & Demond, A. H. September 15, 2000.

Context

This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this report can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this report or its content.

Sponsor

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this report. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Hazardous dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), such as chlorinated solvents, are slightly water soluble and pose a serious threat to soil and groundwater supplies in many portions of the United States. The migration and entrapment of DNAPLs in the subsurface environment is typically believed to be controlled by physical heterogeneities; i.e, layers and lenses of contrasting soil texture. The rationale for this assumption is that capillarity, as determined by the soil texture, is the dominant transport mechanism. Capillarity also depends on interfacial tension and medium wettability. Interfacial tension and medium wettability may be spatially and temporally dependent due to variations in aqueous phase chemistry, contaminant aging, and/or variations in mineralogy and organic matter distributions. Such chemical heterogeneities have largely been ignored to date, even though they are known to have dramatic effects on the hydraulic property relations. Numerical multiphase flow and transport models typically assume that solids are water-wet and that interfacial tension is constant. The primary objective of this research is to investigate the influence of coupled physical and chemical heterogeneities on the migration and entrapment of DNAPLs. This objective will be accomplished through a combination of laboratory and numerical experiments. Laboratory experiments will be conducted to examine: (i) aqueous phase chemistry effects on medium wettability and interfacial tension; and (ii) relative permeability-saturation-capillary pressure relations for chemically heterogeneous systems. An important objective of this research is to modify a two-dimensional multiphase flow and transport model to account for chemically and physically heterogeneous systems. This numerical simulator will be used in conjunction with independently measured parameters to simulate two-dimensional DNAPL infiltration experiments. Comparisons of simulated and laboratory data will provide a means to experimentally validate this model. The validated numerical simulator will subsequently be employed to investigate various innovative remediation schemes such as the use of surfactants and in situ wettability alteration. The accomplishment of the research herein will: (i) lead to a better understanding of the way aqueous phase chemistry changes medium wettability; (ii) validate and/or lead to the development of methods to predict and model wettability on hydraulic property relations; (iii) lead to the development of a multiphase flow simulator that accounts for fractional wettability and concentration dependent interfacial properties; (iv) lead to an improved knowledge of the effects of pore-scale variability on scale-up issues in multiphase systems; (v) provide an understanding of the interaction of chemical and physical heterogeneity on DNAPL flow and entrapment; (vi) provide two-dimensional laboratory data sets to validate multiphase flow models for physically and chemically heterogeneous systems; and (vii) facilitate the development and implementation of innovative remediation strategies.

Physical Description

vp.

Notes

OSTI as DE00787975

Source

  • Other Information: PBD: 15 Sep 2000

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this report in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: DOE/ER/14702
  • Report No.: Project Number 54680
  • Grant Number: FG07-96ER14702
  • DOI: 10.2172/787975 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 787975
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc725337

Collections

This report is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this report?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this report.

Creation Date

  • September 15, 2000

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 29, 2015, 5:31 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 21, 2016, 2:29 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this report last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 4

Interact With This Report

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Abriola, L. M. & Demond, A. H. The Migration and Entrapment of DNAPLs in Physically and Chemically Heterogeneous Porous Media - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/15/2000, report, September 15, 2000; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc725337/: accessed October 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.