Emissions from Trucks using Fischer-Tropsch Diesel Fuel

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The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process can be used to synthesize diesel fuels from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuels may also be economically competitive with California B- diesel fuel if produced in large volumes. overview of Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel production and engine emissions testing is presented. Previous engine laboratory tests indicate that F-T diesel is a promising alternative fuel because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and substantial exhaust emissions reductions can be realized. ... continued below

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Norton, Paul; Vertin, Keith; Bailey, Brent; Clark, Nigel N.; Lyons, Donald W.; Goguen, Stephen et al. October 19, 1998.

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The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process can be used to synthesize diesel fuels from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuels may also be economically competitive with California B- diesel fuel if produced in large volumes. overview of Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel production and engine emissions testing is presented. Previous engine laboratory tests indicate that F-T diesel is a promising alternative fuel because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and substantial exhaust emissions reductions can be realized. The authors have performed preliminary tests to assess the real-world performance of F-T diesel fuels in heavy-duty trucks. Seven White-GMC Class 8 trucks equipped with Caterpillar 10.3 liter engines were tested using F-T diesel fuel. Vehicle emissions tests were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The trucks were found to perform adequately on neat F-T diesel fuel. Compared to a California diesel fuel baseline, neat F-T diesel fuel emitted about 12% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 24% lower particulate matter over a five-mile driving cycle.

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OSTI as DE00771105

Source

  • International Fall Fuels and Lubricants Meeting and Exposition, San Francisco, CA (US), 10/19/1998--10/22/1998; Other Information: Supercedes report DE00771105; PBD: 19 Oct 1998

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  • Report No.: SAE/TPS-982526
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 771105
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc723305

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

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  • October 19, 1998

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  • Sept. 29, 2015, 5:31 a.m.

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  • Aug. 8, 2016, 8:08 p.m.

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Norton, Paul; Vertin, Keith; Bailey, Brent; Clark, Nigel N.; Lyons, Donald W.; Goguen, Stephen et al. Emissions from Trucks using Fischer-Tropsch Diesel Fuel, article, October 19, 1998; (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc723305/: accessed October 24, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.