Enhanced mass removal due to phase explosion during high irradiance nanosecond laser ablation of silicon

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The morphology of craters resulting from high irradiance laser ablation of silicon was measured using a white light interferometry microscope. The craters show a dramatic increase in their depth and volume at a certain irradiance, indicating a change in the primary mechanism for mass removal. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to characterize and differentiate the mass ejection processes for laser irradiances above and below the threshold value. Time-resolved images show distinct features of the mass ejected at irradiances above the threshold value including the presence of micron-sized particulates; this begins at approximately 300 {approx} 400 ns after the start of ... continued below

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Medium: P; Size: 150 pages

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Yoo, Jong Hyun May 20, 2000.

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The morphology of craters resulting from high irradiance laser ablation of silicon was measured using a white light interferometry microscope. The craters show a dramatic increase in their depth and volume at a certain irradiance, indicating a change in the primary mechanism for mass removal. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to characterize and differentiate the mass ejection processes for laser irradiances above and below the threshold value. Time-resolved images show distinct features of the mass ejected at irradiances above the threshold value including the presence of micron-sized particulates; this begins at approximately 300 {approx} 400 ns after the start of laser heating. The analysis of the phenomena was carried out by using two models: a thermal evaporation model and a phase explosion model. Estimation of the crater depth due to the thermally evaporated mass led to a large underestimation of the crater depth for irradiances above the threshold. Above the threshold irradiance, the possibility of phase explosion was analyzed. Two important results are the thickness of the superheated liquid layer that is close to the critical temperature and the time for vapor bubbles that are generated in the superheated liquid to achieve a critical size. After reaching the critical size, vapor bubbles can grow spontaneously resulting in a violent ejection of liquid droplets from the superheated volume. The effects of an induced transparency, i.e. of liquid silicon turning into an optically transparent liquid dielectric medium, are also introduced. The estimated time for a bubble to reach the critical size is in agreement with the delay time measured for the initiation of large mass ejection. Also, the thickness of the superheated liquid layer that is close to the critical temperature at the time of the beginning of the large mass ejection is representative of the crater depth at the threshold irradiance. These results suggest that phase explosion is a plausible thermal mechanism for high irradiance laser ablation. Laser processing parameters were also investigated for nanosecond laser ablation of silicon. Longer incident wavelengths and larger laser beam sizes were associated with higher values of a threshold irradiance.

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Medium: P; Size: 150 pages

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OSTI as DE00764401

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  • Other Information: TH: Thesis (Ph.D.); Submitted to University of California, Berkeley, CA (US)

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  • Report No.: LBNL--46174
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 764401
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc723087

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • May 20, 2000

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  • Sept. 29, 2015, 5:31 a.m.

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  • April 4, 2016, 5:54 p.m.

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Yoo, Jong Hyun. Enhanced mass removal due to phase explosion during high irradiance nanosecond laser ablation of silicon, thesis or dissertation, May 20, 2000; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc723087/: accessed November 17, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.