Analysis of technology options to reduce the fuel consumption of idling trucks

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Long-haul trucks idling overnight consume more than 838 million gallons (20 million barrels) of fuel annually. Idling also emits pollutants. Truck drivers idle their engines primarily to (1) heat or cool the cab and/or sleeper, (2) keep the fuel warm in winter, and (3) keep the engine warm in the winter so that the engine is easier to start. Alternatives to overnight idling could save much of this fuel, reduce emissions, and cut operating costs. Several fuel-efficient alternatives to idling are available to provide heating and cooling: (1) direct-fired heater for cab/sleeper heating, with or without storage cooling; (2) auxiliary ... continued below

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40 pages

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Stodolsky, F.; Gaines, L. & Vyas, A. August 22, 2000.

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Description

Long-haul trucks idling overnight consume more than 838 million gallons (20 million barrels) of fuel annually. Idling also emits pollutants. Truck drivers idle their engines primarily to (1) heat or cool the cab and/or sleeper, (2) keep the fuel warm in winter, and (3) keep the engine warm in the winter so that the engine is easier to start. Alternatives to overnight idling could save much of this fuel, reduce emissions, and cut operating costs. Several fuel-efficient alternatives to idling are available to provide heating and cooling: (1) direct-fired heater for cab/sleeper heating, with or without storage cooling; (2) auxiliary power units; and (3) truck stop electrification. Many of these technologies have drawbacks that limit market acceptance. Options that supply electricity are economically viable for trucks that are idled for 1,000--3,000 or more hours a year, while heater units could be used across the board. Payback times for fleets, which would receive quantity discounts on the prices, would be somewhat shorter.

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40 pages

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  • Other Information: PBD: 22 Aug 2000

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  • Report No.: ANL/ESD-43
  • Grant Number: W-31109-ENG-38
  • DOI: 10.2172/764207 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 764207
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc722515

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  • August 22, 2000

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 29, 2015, 5:31 a.m.

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  • March 11, 2016, 12:36 p.m.

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Stodolsky, F.; Gaines, L. & Vyas, A. Analysis of technology options to reduce the fuel consumption of idling trucks, report, August 22, 2000; Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc722515/: accessed August 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.