Higgs discovery before LHC?

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The standard model (SM) of fundamental interactions, has been the successful theory over the last 25 years. The overall success of the SM in describing the elementary interactions, the discovery of gauge bosons at CERN in the eighties as well as the top discovery at Fermilab in 1995, strengthened the expectation that the Higgs mechanism is the one that gives mass to all particles. At the moment the Higgs particle is the only missing pieces of the puzzle. The sensitivity of parameters of the electroweak theory to the mass of the top quark and of the W boson has been ... continued below

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143 Kilobytes pages

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Chiarelli, G. June 11, 2001.

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Description

The standard model (SM) of fundamental interactions, has been the successful theory over the last 25 years. The overall success of the SM in describing the elementary interactions, the discovery of gauge bosons at CERN in the eighties as well as the top discovery at Fermilab in 1995, strengthened the expectation that the Higgs mechanism is the one that gives mass to all particles. At the moment the Higgs particle is the only missing pieces of the puzzle. The sensitivity of parameters of the electroweak theory to the mass of the top quark and of the W boson has been exploited to provide limits on the mass of the Higgs particle (M{sub H}). Due to the logarithmic dependence of M{sub H} to the ratio of M{sub W}/M{sub top}, a small change in the central values translates into a large change in the limit on M{sub H}. At present (Spring 2001), the current 95% CL lower bound is 212 GeV/c{sup 2} while the upper limit from LEP experiments is 113.5 GeV/c{sup 2} with the additional hint of a possible signal at 115 GeV/c{sup 2}[1]. Due to its coupling Higgs decays into the heaviest possible pair of particles, therefore for M{sub H} below 130 GeV/c{sup 2}(low mass region) the most important channels are b or {tau} pairs, while for heavier masses, the branching fraction into vector boson pairs becomes dominant. A hadron collider provides excellent chances to discover the Higgs given that (in the low mass region) tagging of b-jets would be available. The tool became a reality at the Tevatron during the search for top and is now taken for granted in any experiment at hadron colliders.

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143 Kilobytes pages

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  • 13th Convegno Sulla Fisica AL LEP (LEPTRE 2001), Rome (IT), 04/18/2001--04/20/2001

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  • Report No.: FERMILAB-Conf-01/092-E
  • Grant Number: AC02-76CH03000
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 781632
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc720402

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  • June 11, 2001

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  • Sept. 29, 2015, 5:31 a.m.

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  • April 1, 2016, 4:06 p.m.

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Chiarelli, G. Higgs discovery before LHC?, article, June 11, 2001; Batavia, Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc720402/: accessed September 26, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.