ROBOT TASK SCENE ANALYZER

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Description

Environmental restoration and waste management (ER and WM) challenges in the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and around the world, involve radiation or other hazards which will necessitate the use of remote operations to protect human workers from dangerous exposures. Remote operations carry the implication of greater costs since remote work systems are inherently less productive than contact human work due to the inefficiencies/complexities of teleoperation. To reduce costs and improve quality, much attention has been focused on methods to improve the productivity of combined human operator/remote equipment systems; the achievements to date are modest at best. The most ... continued below

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142 pages

Creation Information

Hamel, William R. & Everett, Steven August 1, 2000.

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This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this report can be viewed below.

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Description

Environmental restoration and waste management (ER and WM) challenges in the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and around the world, involve radiation or other hazards which will necessitate the use of remote operations to protect human workers from dangerous exposures. Remote operations carry the implication of greater costs since remote work systems are inherently less productive than contact human work due to the inefficiencies/complexities of teleoperation. To reduce costs and improve quality, much attention has been focused on methods to improve the productivity of combined human operator/remote equipment systems; the achievements to date are modest at best. The most promising avenue in the near term is to supplement conventional remote work systems with robotic planning and control techniques borrowed from manufacturing and other domains where robotic automation has been used. Practical combinations of teleoperation and robotic control will yield telerobotic work systems that outperform currently available remote equipment. It is believed that practical telerobotic systems may increase remote work efficiencies significantly. Increases of 30% to 50% have been conservatively estimated for typical remote operations. It is important to recognize that the basic hardware and software features of most modern remote manipulation systems can readily accommodate the functionality required for telerobotics. Further, several of the additional system ingredients necessary to implement telerobotic control--machine vision, 3D object and workspace modeling, automatic tool path generation and collision-free trajectory planning--are existent.

Physical Description

142 pages

Notes

INIS; OSTI as DE00789501

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  • Other Information: PBD: 1 Aug 2000

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  • Report No.: AR26-97FT34314--01
  • Grant Number: AR26-97FT34314
  • DOI: 10.2172/789501 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 789501
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc719927

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

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Creation Date

  • August 1, 2000

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 29, 2015, 5:31 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • March 23, 2016, 3:30 p.m.

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Hamel, William R. & Everett, Steven. ROBOT TASK SCENE ANALYZER, report, August 1, 2000; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc719927/: accessed August 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.