A NOVEL CO{sub 2} SEPARATION SYSTEM Metadata

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Title

  • Main Title A NOVEL CO{sub 2} SEPARATION SYSTEM

Creator

  • Author: Copeland, Robert J.
    Creator Type: Personal

Contributor

  • Sponsor: United States. Department of Energy.
    Contributor Type: Organization
    Contributor Info: US Department of Energy (United States)

Publisher

  • Name: National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S.)
    Place of Publication: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    Additional Info: National Energy Technology Lab., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
  • Name: National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S.)
    Place of Publication: Morgantown, West Virginia
    Additional Info: National Energy Technology Lab., Morgantown, WV (United States)

Date

  • Creation: 2000-08-01

Language

  • English

Description

  • Content Description: Because of concern over global climate change, new systems are needed that produce electricity from fossil fuels and emit less CO{sub 2}. The fundamental problem with current systems which recover and concentrate CO{sub 2} from flue gases is the need to separate dilute CO{sub 2} and pressurize it to roughly 35 atm for storage or sequestration. This is an energy intensive process that can reduce plant efficiency by 9-37% and double the cost of electricity. There are two fundamental reasons for the current high costs of power consumption, CO{sub 2} removal, and concentration systems: (1) most disposal, storage and sequestering systems require high pressure CO{sub 2} (at roughly 35 atm). Thus, assuming 90% removal of the CO{sub 2} from a typical atmospheric pressure flue gas that contains 10% CO{sub 2}, the CO{sub 2} is essentially being compressed from 0.01 atm to 35 atm (a pressure ratio of 3,500). This is a very energy intensive process. (2) The absorption-based (amine) separation processes that are used to remove the CO{sub 2} from the flue gas and compress it to 1 atm consume approximately 10 times as much energy as the theoretical work of compression because they are heat driven cycles working over a very low temperature difference. Thus, to avoid the problems of current systems, we need a power cycle in which the CO{sub 2} produced by the oxidation of the fuel is not diluted with a large excess of nitrogen, a power cycle which would allow us to eliminate the very inefficient thermally driven absorption/desorption step. In addition, we would want the CO{sub 2} to be naturally available at high pressure (approximately 3 to 6 atmospheres), which would allow us to greatly reduce the compression ratio between generation and storage (from roughly 3,500 to approximately 8).
  • Physical Description: vp.

Subject

  • Keyword: Removal
  • Keyword: Efficiency
  • Keyword: Compression
  • Keyword: Storage
  • Keyword: Atmospheric Pressure
  • Keyword: Separation Processes
  • Keyword: Oxidation
  • Keyword: Gases
  • Keyword: Electricity
  • Keyword: Climatic Change
  • Keyword: Nitrogen
  • Keyword: Fossil Fuels
  • STI Subject Categories: 29 Energy Planning, Policy And Economy
  • Keyword: Flue Gas

Source

  • Other Information: PBD: 1 Aug 2000

Collection

  • Name: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports
    Code: OSTI

Institution

  • Name: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
    Code: UNTGD

Resource Type

  • Report

Format

  • Text

Identifier

  • Report No.: AC26-98FT40421--04
  • Grant Number: AC26-98FT40421
  • DOI: 10.2172/789052
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 789052
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc719304

Note

  • Display Note: OSTI as DE00789052