The future through the past: The use of analog sites for design criteria and long-term performance assessment of evapotranspiration landfill covers.

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There is growing support for using evapotranspiration (ET) covers for closure of low-level waste (LLW) and other types of waste disposal sites, particularly in the lower latitude arid regions of the western United States. For the Nevada Test Site (NTS), monolayer ET covers is the baseline technology for closure of LLW and mixed LLW cells. To better predict the long-term performance of monolayer ET covers, as well as to identify design criteria that will potentially improve their performance, the properties of, and processes occurring on, analog sites for ET covers on the NTS are being studied. Four analog sites on ... continued below

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Shafer, David; Miller, Julianne; Edwards, Susan & Rawlinson, Stuart October 18, 2001.

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There is growing support for using evapotranspiration (ET) covers for closure of low-level waste (LLW) and other types of waste disposal sites, particularly in the lower latitude arid regions of the western United States. For the Nevada Test Site (NTS), monolayer ET covers is the baseline technology for closure of LLW and mixed LLW cells. To better predict the long-term performance of monolayer ET covers, as well as to identify design criteria that will potentially improve their performance, the properties of, and processes occurring on, analog sites for ET covers on the NTS are being studied. Four analog sites on the NTS have been selected to predict performance of ET covers over a 1,000-year compliance period. Two are relatively recently disturbed sites (within the last 50 years) and have been selected for the evaluation of processes and changes on ET covers for the early period of post-institutional controls when cover maintenance would be discontinued. Two other sites, late to mid-Holocene in age, are intended as analogs for the end (1,000 years or more) of the compliance period. The late to mid-Holocene surfaces are both abandoned alluvial/colluvial deposits, dated by thermoluminescence analysis. The history of the early post-institutional control analog sites is being evaluated by an archaeologist to help determine when the sites were last disturbed or modified and the mode of disturbance, to help set baseline conditions. Similar to the other ''landforms,'' ET covers will evolve over time because of pedogenic, biotic, and climatic processes. Properties of analog sites that could affect ET water-balance performance will be evaluated to help understand ET cover performance over time. Results of analog site work and resultant modifications to design, monitoring and maintenance of ET covers on the NTS will be compared with results of a similar study being done at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), where ET cover closures are planned as well. The comparison will help to distinguish potential regional differences needed in ET cover design. Although both sites are at similar latitudes, the NTS is located in a transition zone between the Mojave and southern Great Basin deserts, while SNL is located in the northern Chihuahuan desert. Differences in vegetation and seasonality of precipitation between the sites are significant.

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1 pages

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INIS; OSTI as DE00788365

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  • 2002 Waste Management Conference, Tucson, AZ (US), 02/24/2002--02/28/2002

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  • Report No.: A-2001-05
  • Grant Number: AC08-00NV13609
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 788365
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc718615

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  • October 18, 2001

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 29, 2015, 5:31 a.m.

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  • Aug. 8, 2016, 7:27 p.m.

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Shafer, David; Miller, Julianne; Edwards, Susan & Rawlinson, Stuart. The future through the past: The use of analog sites for design criteria and long-term performance assessment of evapotranspiration landfill covers., article, October 18, 2001; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc718615/: accessed November 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.