Carbon dioxide reuse and sequestration: The state of the art today

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Atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) are growing steadily. GHG levels seem likely to grow more quickly in the future as developed countries continue to use large amounts of energy, while developing countries become wealthy enough to afford energy-intensive automobiles, refrigerators, and other appliances (as well as live and work in larger, more comfortable structures). To keep GHGs at manageable levels, large decreases in CO{sub 2} emissions will be required. Yet analysts understand the difficulty of developing enough zero- and low-carbon-emission technologies to meet the goal of safe GHG stabilization. Carbon sequestration technologies can help bridge ... continued below

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22 pages; OS: Mac OS 9

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Benson, Sally M.; Dorchak, Thomas; Jacobs, Gary; Ekmann, James; Bishop, Jim & Grahame, Thomas August 1, 2000.

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Description

Atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) are growing steadily. GHG levels seem likely to grow more quickly in the future as developed countries continue to use large amounts of energy, while developing countries become wealthy enough to afford energy-intensive automobiles, refrigerators, and other appliances (as well as live and work in larger, more comfortable structures). To keep GHGs at manageable levels, large decreases in CO{sub 2} emissions will be required. Yet analysts understand the difficulty of developing enough zero- and low-carbon-emission technologies to meet the goal of safe GHG stabilization. Carbon sequestration technologies can help bridge this gap. These technologies are only beginning to be developed, but their promise is already evident. In Europe, CO{sub 2} has been continuously and safely pumped into a below-sea limestone structure for over three years, where it remains. In New Mexico, CO{sub 2} is being used to drive out natural gas from within unminable coal seams 1,000 meters below the surface, and again, continuously injected CO{sub 2} has stayed sequestered for over three years, even though the project was designed for natural gas production, not CO{sub 2} sequestration. These and other beginnings suggest that much CO{sub 2} could be reused or sequestered over time. However, substantial R and D will be required so that CO{sub 2} can be captured inexpensively, and then reused or safely sequestered economically. Advanced concepts likely hold great promise as well.

Physical Description

22 pages; OS: Mac OS 9

Notes

OSTI as DE00780587

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  • ENERGEX 2000, Las Vegas, NV (US), 07/23/2000--07/28/2000

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  • Report No.: LBNL--46701
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 780587
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc718287

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  • August 1, 2000

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  • Sept. 29, 2015, 5:31 a.m.

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  • April 5, 2016, 1:14 p.m.

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Benson, Sally M.; Dorchak, Thomas; Jacobs, Gary; Ekmann, James; Bishop, Jim & Grahame, Thomas. Carbon dioxide reuse and sequestration: The state of the art today, article, August 1, 2000; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc718287/: accessed August 17, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.