Power Production with Zero Atmospheric Emissions for the 21st Century.

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This paper describes a new concept for economically producing power without atmospheric emissions of regulated or greenhouse gases. A 5-MW to 10-MW experimental electric power generating plant is being designed for installation at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform research to develop the new technology and to demonstrate its reliability. The research electric power generating plant will burn any gaseous fuel, including syngas derived from coal, with oxygen. Natural gas and oxygen will be used initially to produce a mixture of steam and carbon dioxide. The mixture will be delivered to three turbines in series to produce electricity. After ... continued below

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Smith, R.J.; Surles, T.; Marasis, B.; Brandt, H & Viteri, F. July 10, 2000.

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This paper describes a new concept for economically producing power without atmospheric emissions of regulated or greenhouse gases. A 5-MW to 10-MW experimental electric power generating plant is being designed for installation at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform research to develop the new technology and to demonstrate its reliability. The research electric power generating plant will burn any gaseous fuel, including syngas derived from coal, with oxygen. Natural gas and oxygen will be used initially to produce a mixture of steam and carbon dioxide. The mixture will be delivered to three turbines in series to produce electricity. After leaving the low-pressure turbine, the gaseous mixture will be cooled in a condenser where the carbon dioxide separates from the steam. The carbon dioxide will be pumped into a local oil formation, which is located at a depth of 460 m below ground adjacent to the Laboratory. In the more general siting case, the carbon dioxide would be pumped into deep underground permeable strata. The natural gas will be combusted with oxygen in a gas generator to produce the turbine working fluid. Three turbines will drive an electric generator to generate electricity. In the first phase of the research, the plant will use three commercially available steam turbines that operate at a temperature of 566 C. In a second phase, the high- and low-pressure turbines will be replaced by turbines using uncooled blade technology developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to permit a turbine operation temperature of 816 C. The intermediate turbine will use actively cooled gas turbine technology and operate at a temperature of 1,425 C. This plant will have an efficiency of 50%. DOE has funded research to reduce the cost of oxygen generation using ceramic membranes. When this technology becomes available and when high-temperature steam turbines are developed, efficiencies of 60% are expected, including the energy cost of carbon dioxide sequestration. Economic studies indicate that the cost penalty for sequestering the carbon dioxide of the research plant will be approximately 4%, when using the second-phase technology, making it one of the lowest-cost options for sequestration of greenhouse gases from a power plant. A similar cost penalty applies to plants with outputs ranging from 100 to 400 MW.

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1.5 Kilobytes pages

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  • 5th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, Cairns (AU), 08/13/2000--08/16/2000

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  • Report No.: UCRL-JC-139637
  • Grant Number: W-7405-Eng-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 790821
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc718071

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  • July 10, 2000

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  • Sept. 29, 2015, 5:31 a.m.

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  • May 6, 2016, 1:51 p.m.

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Smith, R.J.; Surles, T.; Marasis, B.; Brandt, H & Viteri, F. Power Production with Zero Atmospheric Emissions for the 21st Century., article, July 10, 2000; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc718071/: accessed August 19, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.