Fault Current Tests of a 5-m HTS Cable

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The first industrial demonstration of a three-phase high-temperature superconducting transmission power cable at the Southwire manufacturing complex is in progress. One crucial issue during operation of the 30-m HTS cables is whether they could survive the fault current (which can be over an order of magnitude higher than the operating current) in the event of a short-circuit fault and how HTS cables and the cryogenic system would respond. Simulated fault-current tests were performed at ORNL on a 5-m cable. This single-phase cable was constructed in the same way as the 30-m cables and is also rated for 1250 A at ... continued below

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4 pages

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Lue, J.W. February 19, 2001.

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The first industrial demonstration of a three-phase high-temperature superconducting transmission power cable at the Southwire manufacturing complex is in progress. One crucial issue during operation of the 30-m HTS cables is whether they could survive the fault current (which can be over an order of magnitude higher than the operating current) in the event of a short-circuit fault and how HTS cables and the cryogenic system would respond. Simulated fault-current tests were performed at ORNL on a 5-m cable. This single-phase cable was constructed in the same way as the 30-m cables and is also rated for 1250 A at 7.2 kV ac line-to-ground voltage. Tests were performed with fault-current pulses of up to 15 kA (for 0.5 s) with pulse lengths of up to 5 s (at 6.8 kA). Although a large voltage drop was produced across the HTS cable during the fault-current pulse, no significant changes in the coolant temperature, pressure, or joint resistance were observed. The cable survived 15 simulated fault-current shots without any degradation in its V-I characteristics.

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4 pages

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  • 2000 Applied Superconductivity Conference, Location not supplied, Dates not supplied

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  • Report No.: P01-109909
  • Grant Number: AC05-96OR22464
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 775423
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc717970

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  • February 19, 2001

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  • Sept. 29, 2015, 5:31 a.m.

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  • March 21, 2016, 4:43 p.m.

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Lue, J.W. Fault Current Tests of a 5-m HTS Cable, article, February 19, 2001; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc717970/: accessed August 16, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.