Urban Water Demand Estimates Under Increasing Block Rates Metadata

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Title

  • Main Title Urban Water Demand Estimates Under Increasing Block Rates

Creator

  • Author: Nieswiadomy, Michael L.
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: University of North Texas
  • Author: Molina, David J.
    Creator Type: Personal
    Creator Info: University of North Texas

Publisher

  • Name: John Wiley & Sons
    Place of Publication: [Hoboken, New Jersey]

Date

  • Creation: 1988

Language

  • English

Description

  • Content Description: This article discusses urban water demand estimates under increasing block rates.
  • Physical Description: 13 p.

Subject

  • Keyword: residential water
  • Keyword: consumption
  • Keyword: block rate schedules

Source

  • Journal: Growth and Change, 1988, Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons

Citation

  • Publication Title: Growth and Change
  • Volume: 19
  • Issue: 1
  • Pages: 12

Collection

  • Name: UNT Scholarly Works
    Code: UNTSW

Institution

  • Name: UNT College of Arts and Sciences
    Code: UNTCAS

Rights

  • Rights Access: public

Resource Type

  • Article

Format

  • Text

Identifier

  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc71792

Degree

  • Academic Department: Economics

Note

  • Display Note: Abstract: A residential water demand equation is estimated using the only data set on water consumption that contains time series (monthly) observations on individual customers facing an increasing block rate schedule. Because the price of water both determines, and is determined by, usage, ordinary least squares estimation will yield biased estimates. Thus, two-stage least squares and instrumental variables techniques are used. The estimated coefficients on lawn size, weather, house size, and income have the expected signs and are statistically significant. However, there is not any significant response to changes in water price, perhaps due to the relatively low cost of water.