GRAIL-genQuest: A comprehensive computational system for DNA sequence analysis. Final report, DOE SBIR Phase II

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Recent advances in DNA sequencing and genome mapping technologies are making it possible, for the first time in history, to find genes in plants and animals and to elucidate their function. This means that diagnostics and therapeutics can be developed for human diseases such as cancer, obesity, hypertension, and cardiovascular problems. Crop and animal strains can be developed that are hardier, resistant to diseases, and produce higher yields. The challenge is to develop tools that will find the nucleotides in the DNA of a living organism that comprise a particular gene. In the human genome alone it is estimated that ... continued below

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Manning, Ruth Ann January 5, 1999.

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Recent advances in DNA sequencing and genome mapping technologies are making it possible, for the first time in history, to find genes in plants and animals and to elucidate their function. This means that diagnostics and therapeutics can be developed for human diseases such as cancer, obesity, hypertension, and cardiovascular problems. Crop and animal strains can be developed that are hardier, resistant to diseases, and produce higher yields. The challenge is to develop tools that will find the nucleotides in the DNA of a living organism that comprise a particular gene. In the human genome alone it is estimated that only about 51% of the approximately 3 billion pairs of nucleotides code for some 100,000 human genes. In this search for nucleotides within a genome which are active in the actual coding of proteins, efficient tools to locate and identify their function can be of significant value to mankind. Software tools such as ApoCom GRAIL{trademark} have assisted in this search. It can be used to analyze genome information, to identify exons (coding regions) and to construct gene models. Using a neural network approach, this software can ''learn'' sequence patterns and refine its ability to recognize a pattern as it is exposed to more and more examples of it. Since 1992 versions of GRAIL{trademark} have been publicly available over the Internet from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Because of the potential for security and patent compromise, these Internet versions are not available to many researchers in pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies who cannot send proprietary sequences past their data-secure firewalls. ApoCom is making available commercial versions of the GRAIL{trademark} software to run self-contained over local area networks. As part of the commercialization effort, ApoCom has developed a new Java{trademark}-based graphical user interface, the ApoCom Client Tool for Genomics (ACTG){trademark}. Two products, ApoCom GRAIL{trademark} Network Edition and ApoCom GRAIL{trademark} Personal Edition, have been developed to reach two diverse niche markets in the Phase III commercialization of this software. As a result of this project ApoCom GRAIL{trademark} can now be made available to the desktop (UNIX{reg_sign}, Windows{reg_sign} 95 and Windows NT{reg_sign}, or Mac{trademark} 0S) of any researcher who needs it.

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OSTI as DE00770188

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  • Other Information: PBD: 5 Jan 1999

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  • Report No.: DOE/ER/81923
  • Grant Number: FG02-95ER81923
  • DOI: 10.2172/770188 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 770188
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc717760

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  • January 5, 1999

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  • Sept. 29, 2015, 5:31 a.m.

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  • Dec. 15, 2015, 5:52 p.m.

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Manning, Ruth Ann. GRAIL-genQuest: A comprehensive computational system for DNA sequence analysis. Final report, DOE SBIR Phase II, report, January 5, 1999; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc717760/: accessed August 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.