Autonomous system for pathogen detection and identification

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This purpose of this project is to build a prototype instrument that will, running unattended, detect, identify, and quantify BW agents. In order to accomplish this, we have chosen to start with the world� s leading, proven, assays for pathogens: surface-molecular recognition assays, such as antibody-based assays, implemented on a high-performance, identification (ID)-capable flow cytometer, and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for nucleic-acid based assays. With these assays, we must integrate the capability to: l collect samples from aerosols, water, or surfaces; l perform sample preparation prior to the assays; l incubate the prepared samples, if necessary, for a period ... continued below

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Belgrader, P; Benett, W; Langlois, R; Long, G; Mariella, R; Milanovich, F et al. September 24, 1998.

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Description

This purpose of this project is to build a prototype instrument that will, running unattended, detect, identify, and quantify BW agents. In order to accomplish this, we have chosen to start with the world� s leading, proven, assays for pathogens: surface-molecular recognition assays, such as antibody-based assays, implemented on a high-performance, identification (ID)-capable flow cytometer, and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for nucleic-acid based assays. With these assays, we must integrate the capability to: l collect samples from aerosols, water, or surfaces; l perform sample preparation prior to the assays; l incubate the prepared samples, if necessary, for a period of time; l transport the prepared, incubated samples to the assays; l perform the assays; l interpret and report the results of the assays. Issues such as reliability, sensitivity and accuracy, quantity of consumables, maintenance schedule, etc. must be addressed satisfactorily to the end user. The highest possible sensitivity and specificity of the assay must be combined with no false alarms. Today, we have assays that can, in under 30 minutes, detect and identify simulants for BW agents at concentrations of a few hundred colony-forming units per ml of solution. If the bio-aerosol sampler of this system collects 1000 Ymin and concentrates the respirable particles into 1 ml of solution with 70% processing efficiency over a period of 5 minutes, then this translates to a detection/ID capability of under 0.1 agent-containing particle/liter of air.

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  • SPIE's International Symposium on Industrial and Environmental Monitors and Biosensors, Boston, MA, November 1-6, 1998

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  • Other: DE00007821
  • Report No.: UCRL-JC-128919
  • Grant Number: W-7405-Eng-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 7821
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc716580

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  • September 24, 1998

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  • Sept. 29, 2015, 5:31 a.m.

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  • May 6, 2016, 9:36 p.m.

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Belgrader, P; Benett, W; Langlois, R; Long, G; Mariella, R; Milanovich, F et al. Autonomous system for pathogen detection and identification, article, September 24, 1998; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc716580/: accessed August 19, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.