Experiments in Support of Pressure Enhanced Penetration with Shaped Charge Perforators

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Computational analysis demonstrated that the penetration of a shaped charge could be substantially enhanced by imploding the liner in a high pressure light gas atmosphere. The gas pressure helps confine the jet on the axis of penetration in the latter stages of formation. A light gas, such as helium or hydrogen, is required in order to keep the gas density low enough so as not to inhibit liner collapse. These results have now been confirmed by experiment. Identical 5-foot long guns, each containing 37 perforators at a shot density of 12 SPF, were inserted in two API Section 1 concrete ... continued below

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2100 Kilobytes pages

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Glenn, L.A.; Chase, J.B.; Barker, J. & Leidel, D.J. November 1, 1999.

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Computational analysis demonstrated that the penetration of a shaped charge could be substantially enhanced by imploding the liner in a high pressure light gas atmosphere. The gas pressure helps confine the jet on the axis of penetration in the latter stages of formation. A light gas, such as helium or hydrogen, is required in order to keep the gas density low enough so as not to inhibit liner collapse. These results have now been confirmed by experiment. Identical 5-foot long guns, each containing 37 perforators at a shot density of 12 SPF, were inserted in two API Section 1 concrete targets, poured on the same day and cured for the same period. One of the guns was fired with interior ambient (0.1 MPa) air pressure and the other with helium at 13.8 MPa (2,000 psia). The average penetration from the 37 perforations with the helium system increased 40.3% over that obtained with the conventional system.

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2100 Kilobytes pages

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  • 18th International Symposium & Exhibition on Ballistics, San Antonio, TX (US), 11/15/1999--11/19/1999

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  • Report No.: UCRL-JC-132950
  • Grant Number: W-7405-Eng-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 790823
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc716329

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  • November 1, 1999

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  • Sept. 29, 2015, 5:31 a.m.

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  • May 6, 2016, 4:18 p.m.

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Glenn, L.A.; Chase, J.B.; Barker, J. & Leidel, D.J. Experiments in Support of Pressure Enhanced Penetration with Shaped Charge Perforators, article, November 1, 1999; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc716329/: accessed August 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.