Survey techniques developed to align stacked beamlines at CEBAF

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The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, Virginia is a new accelerator designed to produce 4 GeV 200 micro-amp continuous wave beams for nuclear physics research. It consists of two superconducting linacs each accelerating electrons by 400 MeV and linked by arcs allowing five pass recirculation. These linacs form the straight sections in a racetrack shaped accelerator contained in over 1.3 km of tunnel. The beam lines will consist of 42 superconducting accelerating cryomodules (in the linacs only), over 400 dipoles, 650 quadrupoles, and 100 sextupoles, most of the which are concentrated in the two arc sections ... continued below

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381 Kilobytes pages

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Curtis, C. J.; Oren, W. & Tremblay, K. J. January 1, 1994.

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The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) in Newport News, Virginia is a new accelerator designed to produce 4 GeV 200 micro-amp continuous wave beams for nuclear physics research. It consists of two superconducting linacs each accelerating electrons by 400 MeV and linked by arcs allowing five pass recirculation. These linacs form the straight sections in a racetrack shaped accelerator contained in over 1.3 km of tunnel. The beam lines will consist of 42 superconducting accelerating cryomodules (in the linacs only), over 400 dipoles, 650 quadrupoles, and 100 sextupoles, most of the which are concentrated in the two arc sections of the machine. It is here that the single beam fine from the linacs is split into five beams of offering energy and transported to the opposite linac where it is recombined into a single beam to again pass through a linac and receive additional acceleration. These recirculation arcs are designed to maintain beam quality through a lattice which is achromatic, isochronous and whose length is equal to a multiple number of RF wavelengths. The short term relative alignment tolerances coupled with the beam fine design reflect the beam quality issues while absolute positioning determines the range of adjustment needed to match the RF phase in the linac segments. The alignment techniques which use a monumented control network as a reference, are designed to position stacked magnets and their support systems to these tolerances. Specialized procedures were tailored from existing hardware and software systems to address each phase or step of the alignment process. This allowed a relatively rapid expansion of alignment services at a new laboratory where surveying support was not seriously addressed until more then one third of the enclosure had been built.

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381 Kilobytes pages

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  • Report No.: CEBAF-PR-94-002
  • Report No.: DOE/ER/40150-1640
  • Grant Number: AC05-84ER40150
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 756862
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc711931

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • January 1, 1994

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  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • Feb. 5, 2016, 8:59 p.m.

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Curtis, C. J.; Oren, W. & Tremblay, K. J. Survey techniques developed to align stacked beamlines at CEBAF, article, January 1, 1994; Newport News, Virginia. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc711931/: accessed October 20, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.