Physics of advanced tokamaks

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Significant reductions in the size and cost of a fusion power plant core can be realized if simultaneous improvements in the energy replacement time, {tau}{sub E}, and the plasma pressure or beta, {beta}{sub T} = 2 {micro}{sub 0} <P>/B{sup 2} can be achieved in steady-state conditions with high self-driven, bootstrap current fraction. Significant recent progress has been made in experimentally achieving these high performance regimes and in developing a theoretical understanding of the underlying physics. Three operational scenarios have demonstrated potential for steady state high performance, the radiative improved (RI) mode, the high internal inductance or high {ell}{sub i} scenario, ... continued below

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19 p.

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Taylor, T. S. November 1997.

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Significant reductions in the size and cost of a fusion power plant core can be realized if simultaneous improvements in the energy replacement time, {tau}{sub E}, and the plasma pressure or beta, {beta}{sub T} = 2 {micro}{sub 0} <P>/B{sup 2} can be achieved in steady-state conditions with high self-driven, bootstrap current fraction. Significant recent progress has been made in experimentally achieving these high performance regimes and in developing a theoretical understanding of the underlying physics. Three operational scenarios have demonstrated potential for steady state high performance, the radiative improved (RI) mode, the high internal inductance or high {ell}{sub i} scenario, and the negative central magnetic shear, NCS (or reversed shear, RS) scenario. In a large number of tokamaks, reduced ion thermal transport to near neoclassical values, and reduced particle transport have been observed in the region of negative or very low magnetic shear: the transport reduction is consistent with stabilization of microturbulence by sheared E x B flow. There is strong temporal and spatial correlation between the increased sheared E x B flow, the reduction in the measured turbulence, and the reduction in transport. The DIII-D tokamak, the JET tokamak and the JT-60U tokamak have all observed significant increases in plasma performance in the NCS operational regime. Strong plasma shaping and broad pressure profiles, provided by the H-mode edge, allow high beta operation, consistent with theoretical predictions; and normalized beta values up to {beta}{sub T}/(I/aB) {equivalent_to} {beta}{sub N} {approximately} 4.5%-m-T/MA simultaneously with confinement enhancement over L-mode scaling, H = {tau}/{tau}{sub ITER-89P} {approximately} 4, have been achieved in the DIII-D tokamak. In the JT-60U tokamak, deuterium discharges with negative central magnetic shear, NCS, have reached equivalent break-even conditions, Q{sub DT} (equiv) = 1.

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19 p.

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INIS; OSTI as DE98003429

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  • 24. EPS conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics, Berchtesgaden (Germany), 9-13 Jun 1997

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  • Other: DE98003429
  • Report No.: GA--A22704
  • Report No.: CONF-9706131--
  • Grant Number: AC03-89ER51114;W-7405-ENG-48;AC05-96OR22464;AC02-76CH03073;FG02-89ER53297;FG02-91ER54109;FG05-88ER53266
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 674703
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc711070

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • November 1997

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  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • Aug. 23, 2016, 3:51 p.m.

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Taylor, T. S. Physics of advanced tokamaks, article, November 1997; San Diego, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc711070/: accessed December 16, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.