Hadron Collider Detectors

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Experiments are being prepared at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider that promise to deliver extraordinary insights into the nature of spontaneous symmetry breaking, and the role of supersymmetry in the universe. This article reviews the goals, challenges, and designs of these experiments. The first hadron collider, the ISR at CERN, has to overcome two initial obstacles. The first was low luminosity, which steadily improved over time. The second was the broad angular spread of interesting events. In this regard Maurice Jacob noted (1): The answer is ... sophisticated detectors covering at least the whole central region ... continued below

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12 pages

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Incandela, J.R. March 7, 2000.

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Description

Experiments are being prepared at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider that promise to deliver extraordinary insights into the nature of spontaneous symmetry breaking, and the role of supersymmetry in the universe. This article reviews the goals, challenges, and designs of these experiments. The first hadron collider, the ISR at CERN, has to overcome two initial obstacles. The first was low luminosity, which steadily improved over time. The second was the broad angular spread of interesting events. In this regard Maurice Jacob noted (1): The answer is ... sophisticated detectors covering at least the whole central region (45{degree} {le} {theta} {le} 135{degree}) and full azimuth. This statement, while obvious today, reflects the major revelation of the ISR period that hadrons have partonic substructure. The result was an unexpectedly strong hadronic yield at large transverse momentum (p{sub T}). Partly because of this, the ISR missed the discovery of the J/{psi} and later missed the {Upsilon}. The ISR era was therefore somewhat less auspicious than it might have been. It did however make important contributions in areas such as jet production and charm excitation and it paved the way for the SPS collider, also at CERN.

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12 pages

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  • INSTR99, Hamamatsu (JP), 11/15/1999

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  • Report No.: FERMILAB--Conf-00/038-E
  • Grant Number: AC02-76CH03000
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 751974
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc710646

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  • March 7, 2000

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  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • April 1, 2016, 4:05 p.m.

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Incandela, J.R. Hadron Collider Detectors, article, March 7, 2000; Batavia, Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc710646/: accessed August 24, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.