Evaluation of the potential for agricultural development at the Hanford Site

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By 2050, when cleanup of the Hanford Site is expected to be completed, large worldwide demands to increase the global production of animalhlish protein, food, and fiber are anticipated, despite advancements in crop breeding, genetic engineering, and other technologies. World population is projected to double to more than 12 billion people, straining already stressed worldwide agricultural resources. The current world surpluses in many commodities will not last when faced with increasing population, decreasing ocean fisheries, and rapid loss of productive lands from soil salivation and erosion. The production of pharmaceuticals from bioengineered plants and animals will undoubtedly add more pressure ... continued below

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Evans, RG; Hattendorf, MJ & Kincaid, CT February 25, 2000.

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By 2050, when cleanup of the Hanford Site is expected to be completed, large worldwide demands to increase the global production of animalhlish protein, food, and fiber are anticipated, despite advancements in crop breeding, genetic engineering, and other technologies. World population is projected to double to more than 12 billion people, straining already stressed worldwide agricultural resources. The current world surpluses in many commodities will not last when faced with increasing population, decreasing ocean fisheries, and rapid loss of productive lands from soil salivation and erosion. The production of pharmaceuticals from bioengineered plants and animals will undoubtedly add more pressure on the already limited (and declining) arable land base. In addition there will be pressure to produce crops that can help reduce the world's dependence on petroleum and be used for chemical plant feedstock. These external, formidable pressures will necessitate increasing investments in irrigation infi-a-structures in many areas of the world to increase productivity. Intensive greenhouse culture and aqua-culture also will be greatly expanded. There will be large economic and social pressures to expand production in areas such as the Pacific Northwest. Agricultural exports will continue to be important The most likely large areas for expanded irrigation in the Pacific Northwest are the undeveloped East High areas of the Columbia Basin Project and non-restricted areas within the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Both of these are potentially highly productive area: for producing food and export capital. The environmental concerns will be large however, the favorable growing conditions, high-quality (low-salinity) abundant water supplies and minimal problems with salivation of soils make the Pacific Northwest a very desirable region for economically sustainable expansion from a world perspective.

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Medium: P; Size: vp.

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INIS; OSTI as DE00751663

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  • Other Information: PBD: 25 Feb 2000

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  • Report No.: PNNL-13125
  • Report No.: 820201000
  • Grant Number: AC06-76RL01830
  • DOI: 10.2172/751663 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 751663
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc710277

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • February 25, 2000

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • April 6, 2016, 2:15 p.m.

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Evans, RG; Hattendorf, MJ & Kincaid, CT. Evaluation of the potential for agricultural development at the Hanford Site, report, February 25, 2000; Richland, Washington. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc710277/: accessed December 16, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.