Development of a bottom-hole gamma-ray diagnostic capability for high-level environments, during CTBT on-site inspection drilling

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The verification regime of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) provides for the possibility of on-site inspections (OSI`s) to resolve questions concerning suspicious events which may have been clandestine nuclear tests. The initial phase of an OSI may provide enough evidence to justify a request to the CTBT Organization for allowing drilling, so as to recover further evidence of a nuclear event. The equipment that was used for such `re-entry` drilling in the days of U.S. underground nuclear testing is considered too heavy and cumbersome for OSI deployments. So, an effort was initiated in 1995 to define, assemble, and demonstrate ... continued below

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12 p.

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Fontenot, Robert & Fontenot, R., Schlumberger-Anadrill, Sugarland, TX, LLNL May 1, 1998.

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Description

The verification regime of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) provides for the possibility of on-site inspections (OSI`s) to resolve questions concerning suspicious events which may have been clandestine nuclear tests. The initial phase of an OSI may provide enough evidence to justify a request to the CTBT Organization for allowing drilling, so as to recover further evidence of a nuclear event. The equipment that was used for such `re-entry` drilling in the days of U.S. underground nuclear testing is considered too heavy and cumbersome for OSI deployments. So, an effort was initiated in 1995 to define, assemble, and demonstrate a new OSI drilling capability. Coiled-tubing (C-T) was selected as the most attractive technology because of its portability and its directional drilling capability (1). Following this selection, a preliminary engineering design was performed in 1996 for a Rapid Deployment Drilling System (RDDS). This system must have capabilities for downhole diagnostics of temperature and gamma-rays, since both types of data could be used to confirm the presence of an underground nuclear explosion. The study then identified two candidate downhole diagnostic systems operating with CT: the VIPER system of Schlumberger-Anadrill, and the Transocean system (2). In the current phase of this continuing effort the VIPER system has been retained as the first candidate because, everything else being equal, it is readily accessible domestically. One project, conducted by Maurer Engineering of Houston, TX, is specifying the details of the proposed CT system, its footprint, its modalities of air transport, and its costs of deployment and operation. The expected rate-of-penetration in rocks with unconfined compressive strength up to 14,500 psi (100 MPa) is also being estimated, based on laboratory-scale drilling tests on rock cores. Another project, which is the object of this report, has for an objective to develop and calibrate a downhole gamma-ray diagnostic capable of operating in the expected high-intensity environment near an underground nuclear cavity. The commercially available Anadrill VIPER logging assembly is calibrated to operate at levels of 0 to 250 American Petroleum Institute (API) units. These levels are much smaller than those necessary to confirm a clandestine nuclear explosion. The scope of the project is to make the necessary modifications to the VIPER gamma-ray module to meet minimum detection requirements of 50,000 API. At such a level, which is more than two orders of magnitude higher than seen in natural formations, the origin of gamma-rays could only be from underground nuclear test products. 2 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

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12 p.

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OSTI as DE98057873

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  • Other Information: PBD: 1 May 1998

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  • Other: DE98057873
  • Report No.: UCRL-CR--130663
  • Report No.: INIS-XA-N--326
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 675012
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc709999

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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Creation Date

  • May 1, 1998

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • Feb. 18, 2016, 12:30 p.m.

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Fontenot, Robert & Fontenot, R., Schlumberger-Anadrill, Sugarland, TX, LLNL. Development of a bottom-hole gamma-ray diagnostic capability for high-level environments, during CTBT on-site inspection drilling, report, May 1, 1998; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc709999/: accessed July 16, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.