Comparison among five hydrodynamic codes with a diverging-converging nozzle experiment

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A realistic open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket simulation model must be capable of a self-consistent nozzle calculation in conjunction with coupled radiation and neutron transport in three spatial dimensions. As part of the development effort for such a model, five hydrodynamic codes were used to compare with a converging-diverging nozzle experiment. The codes used in the comparison are CHAD, FLUENT, KIVA2, RAMPANT, and VNAP2. Solution accuracy as a function of mesh size is important because, in the near term, a practical three-dimensional simulation model will require rather coarse zoning across the nozzle throat. In the study, four different grids were considered. ... continued below

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40 p.

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Thode, L. E.; Cline, M. C.; DeVolder, B. G.; Sahota, M. S. & Zerkle, D. K. September 1, 1999.

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  • Los Alamos National Laboratory
    Publisher Info: Los Alamos National Lab., Los Alamos, NM (United States)
    Place of Publication: Los Alamos, New Mexico

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Description

A realistic open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket simulation model must be capable of a self-consistent nozzle calculation in conjunction with coupled radiation and neutron transport in three spatial dimensions. As part of the development effort for such a model, five hydrodynamic codes were used to compare with a converging-diverging nozzle experiment. The codes used in the comparison are CHAD, FLUENT, KIVA2, RAMPANT, and VNAP2. Solution accuracy as a function of mesh size is important because, in the near term, a practical three-dimensional simulation model will require rather coarse zoning across the nozzle throat. In the study, four different grids were considered. (1) coarse, radially uniform grid, (2) coarse, radially nonuniform grid, (3) fine, radially uniform grid, and (4) fine, radially nonuniform grid. The study involves code verification, not prediction. In other words, the authors know the solution they want to match, so they can change methods and/or modify an algorithm to best match this class of problem. In this context, it was necessary to use the higher-order methods in both FLUENT and RAMPANT. In addition, KIVA2 required a modification that allows significantly more accurate solutions for a converging-diverging nozzle. From a predictive point of view, code accuracy with no tuning is an important result. The most accurate codes on a coarse grid, CHAD and VNAP2, did not require any tuning. Their main comparison among the codes was the radial dependence of the Mach number across the nozzle throat. All five codes yielded a very similar solution with fine, radially uniform and radially nonuniform grids. However, the codes yielded significantly different solutions with coarse, radially uniform and radially nonuniform grids. For all the codes, radially nonuniform zoning across the throat significantly increased solution accuracy with a coarse mesh. None of the codes agrees in detail with the weak shock located downstream of the nozzle throat, but all the codes indicated the presence of a weak downstream shock.

Physical Description

40 p.

Notes

INIS; OSTI as DE00752367

Medium: P; Size: 40 pages

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  • Other Information: PBD: 1 Sep 1999

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  • Report No.: LA-13653
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • DOI: 10.2172/752367 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 752367
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc709526

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • September 1, 1999

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • April 12, 2017, 2:47 p.m.

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Thode, L. E.; Cline, M. C.; DeVolder, B. G.; Sahota, M. S. & Zerkle, D. K. Comparison among five hydrodynamic codes with a diverging-converging nozzle experiment, report, September 1, 1999; Los Alamos, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc709526/: accessed December 16, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.