An investigation of late-combustion soot burnout in a DI diesel engine using simultaneous planar imaging of soot and OH radical

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Diesel engine design continues to be driven by the need to improve performance while at the same time achieving further reductions in emissions. The development of new designs to accomplish these goals requires an understanding of how the emissions are produced in the engine. Laser-imaging diagnostics are uniquely capable of providing this information, and the understanding of diesel combustion and emissions formation has been advanced considerably in recent years by their application. However, previous studies have generally focused on the early and middle stages of diesel combustion. These previous laser-imaging studies do provide important insight into the soot formation and ... continued below

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13 p.

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Dec, John E. & Kelly-Zion, Peter L. October 1, 1999.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 23 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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  • Sandia National Laboratories
    Publisher Info: Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM, and Livermore, CA (United States)
    Place of Publication: Albuquerque, New Mexico

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Description

Diesel engine design continues to be driven by the need to improve performance while at the same time achieving further reductions in emissions. The development of new designs to accomplish these goals requires an understanding of how the emissions are produced in the engine. Laser-imaging diagnostics are uniquely capable of providing this information, and the understanding of diesel combustion and emissions formation has been advanced considerably in recent years by their application. However, previous studies have generally focused on the early and middle stages of diesel combustion. These previous laser-imaging studies do provide important insight into the soot formation and oxidation processes during the main combustion event. They indicate that prior to the end of injection, soot formation is initiated by fuel-rich premixed combustion (equivalence ratio > 4) near the upstream limit of the luminous portion of the reacting fuel jet. The soot is then oxidized at the diffusion flame around the periphery of the luminous plume. Under typical diesel engine conditions, the diffusion flame does not burn the remaining fuel and soot as rapidly as it is supplied, resulting in an expanding region of rich combustion products and soot. This is evident in natural emission images by the increasing size of the luminous soot cloud prior to the end of injection. Hence, the amount of soot in the combustion chamber typically increases until shortly after the end of fuel injection, at which time the main soot formation period ends and the burnout phase begins. Sampling valve and two-color pyrometry data indicate that the vast majority (more than 90%) of the soot formed is oxidized before combustion ends; however, it is generally thought that a small fraction of this soot from the main combustion zones is not consumed and is the source of tail pipe soot emissions.

Physical Description

13 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE00751142

Medium: P; Size: 13 pages

Source

  • 1999 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction Workshop, Castine, ME (US), 07/05/1999--07/08/1999

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  • Report No.: SAND99-8626C
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 751142
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc708841

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  • October 1, 1999

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  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • April 7, 2017, 1:15 p.m.

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Dec, John E. & Kelly-Zion, Peter L. An investigation of late-combustion soot burnout in a DI diesel engine using simultaneous planar imaging of soot and OH radical, article, October 1, 1999; Albuquerque, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc708841/: accessed September 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.