HAWT dynamic stall response asymmetries under yawed flow conditions

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Horizontal axis wind turbines can experience significant time varying aerodynamic loads, potentially causing adverse effects on structures, mechanical components, and power production. As designers attempt lighter and more flexible wind energy machines, greater accuracy and robustness will become even more critical in future aerodynamics models. Aerodynamics modeling advances, in turn, will rely on more thorough comprehension of the three-dimensional, unsteady, vortical flows that dominate wind turbine blade aerodynamics under high load conditions. To experimentally characterize these flows, turbine blade surface pressures were acquired at multiple span locations via the NREL Phase IV Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment. Surface pressures and associated normal ... continued below

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Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.; Hand, M. & Simms, D. February 28, 2000.

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Horizontal axis wind turbines can experience significant time varying aerodynamic loads, potentially causing adverse effects on structures, mechanical components, and power production. As designers attempt lighter and more flexible wind energy machines, greater accuracy and robustness will become even more critical in future aerodynamics models. Aerodynamics modeling advances, in turn, will rely on more thorough comprehension of the three-dimensional, unsteady, vortical flows that dominate wind turbine blade aerodynamics under high load conditions. To experimentally characterize these flows, turbine blade surface pressures were acquired at multiple span locations via the NREL Phase IV Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment. Surface pressures and associated normal force histories were used to characterize dynamic stall vortex kinematics and normal force amplification. Dynamic stall vortices and normal force amplification were confirmed to occur in response to angle of attack excursions above the static stall threshold. Stall vortices occupied approximately one-half of the blade span and persisted for nearly one-fourth of the blade rotation cycle. Stall vortex convection varied along the blade, resulting in dramatic deformation of the vortex. Presence and deformation of the dynamic stall vortex produced corresponding amplification of normal forces. Analyses revealed consistent alterations to vortex kinematics in response to changes in reduced frequency, span location, and yaw error. Finally, vortex structures and kinematics not previously documented for wind turbine blades were isolated.

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  • 2000 ASME/AIAA Wind Energy Symposium, Reno, NV (US), 01/10/2000--01/13/2000

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  • Report No.: NREL/CP-500-27898
  • Grant Number: AC36-99GO10337
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 754739
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc708802

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  • February 28, 2000

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  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • March 30, 2016, 12:46 p.m.

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Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.; Hand, M. & Simms, D. HAWT dynamic stall response asymmetries under yawed flow conditions, article, February 28, 2000; Golden, Colorado. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc708802/: accessed October 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.