Studying the spin structure of the proton using the solenoidal tracker at RHIC

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The primary goal of RHIC is to produce nuclear matter under extremes of temperature and density sufficient to excite the QCD vacuum, resulting in the creation of a deconfined plasma of quarks and gluons. A second goal central to the RHIC scientific program is to advance the study of the spin structure of the proton significantly beyond what has been learned from deep inelastic scattering (DIS) measurements by studying spin asymmetries in strong processes involving the partonic constituents of polarized protons. After decades of being regarded as an inessential complication to the strong interaction at high energy, spin has again ... continued below

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11 p.

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Hallman, T.J. & Collaboration, STAR May 1, 1998.

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The primary goal of RHIC is to produce nuclear matter under extremes of temperature and density sufficient to excite the QCD vacuum, resulting in the creation of a deconfined plasma of quarks and gluons. A second goal central to the RHIC scientific program is to advance the study of the spin structure of the proton significantly beyond what has been learned from deep inelastic scattering (DIS) measurements by studying spin asymmetries in strong processes involving the partonic constituents of polarized protons. After decades of being regarded as an inessential complication to the strong interaction at high energy, spin has again become a topic of considerable experimental and theoretical interest. This is largely due to the observation from DIS that the net contribution to the proton spin from the quark constituents ({approximately} 30%) is smaller than expected relative to the momentum carried in this sector. The RHIC accelerator will provide an unprecedented opportunity to fully explore the spin structure of the proton with high precision studies focused on measuring the spin-dependent parton distributions (valence quark, sea quark, gluon) of the proton. It is designed to operate both with high luminosity (10{sup 31}--10{sup 32} cm{sup {minus}2} sec{sup {minus}1}) and high polarization ({approximately} 70%). In addition, the energy range at RHIC ({radical}s = 200--500 GeV) is sufficiently high that spin effects in polarized proton interactions should be calculable once the spin structure of the proton is sufficiently understood. The experimental results will therefore provide a rigorous test of QCD. A further focus of the RHIC spin physics program will be to search for physics beyond the standard model. The increased sensitivity afforded by using polarized protons to study parity violation in inclusive jet production at high p{sub t} makes this exploration competitive with respect to ongoing searches using unpolarized beams.

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11 p.

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INIS; OSTI as DE98005768

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  • 14. winter workshop on nuclear dynamics, Snowbird, UT (United States), 1-7 Feb 1998

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  • Other: DE98005768
  • Report No.: BNL--65524
  • Report No.: CONF-980239--
  • Grant Number: AC02-98CH10886
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 658443
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc708328

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • May 1, 1998

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  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • Nov. 9, 2015, 8:56 p.m.

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Hallman, T.J. & Collaboration, STAR. Studying the spin structure of the proton using the solenoidal tracker at RHIC, article, May 1, 1998; Upton, New York. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc708328/: accessed April 24, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.