SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES

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Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation ... continued below

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page(s) 36

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Hulbert, S. L. & Williams, G. P. July 1998.

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Description

Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light.

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page(s) 36

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INIS; Academic Press, Inc., 525 B Street, Suite 1900, San Diego, CA 92101-9544 (US); OSTI as DE00757131

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  • Other Information: PBD: 1 Jul 1998; Related Information: In: Methods of vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy, by Samson, J.A.R.

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  • Report No.: BNL--65801
  • Report No.: KC0204011
  • Grant Number: AC02-98CH10886
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 757131
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc707628

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  • July 1998

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  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • Nov. 9, 2015, 4:21 p.m.

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Hulbert, S. L. & Williams, G. P. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES, text, July 1998; San Diego, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc707628/: accessed December 14, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.