The self-supporting disc: A specimen geometry exhibiting low secondary characteristic fluorescence

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Secondary characteristic fluorescence, when expressed relative to the primary intensity of the fluorescing element, can be written as the product of three factors, which represent the probabilities of the various processes that govern the magnitude of fluorescence and thus have values between zero and one. Two of these factors are characteristic of the material being analyzed. The factor C{sub X}{sup Y} is the likelihood that the primary x ray of Y is absorbed by the element X if it is absorbed in the fluoresced volume of the specimen. The factor P{sub X} is the probability that element X, having absorbed ... continued below

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3 p.

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Anderson, I.M.; Bentley, J. & Carter, C.B. June 1, 1995.

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  • Anderson, I.M.
  • Bentley, J. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.
  • Carter, C.B. Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

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Description

Secondary characteristic fluorescence, when expressed relative to the primary intensity of the fluorescing element, can be written as the product of three factors, which represent the probabilities of the various processes that govern the magnitude of fluorescence and thus have values between zero and one. Two of these factors are characteristic of the material being analyzed. The factor C{sub X}{sup Y} is the likelihood that the primary x ray of Y is absorbed by the element X if it is absorbed in the fluoresced volume of the specimen. The factor P{sub X} is the probability that element X, having absorbed the primary x ray, emits the secondary x ray of interest. The third factor is the likelihood that the primary x ray is absorbed in the fluoresced volume, and is denoted {Omega}{sub eff}/4{pi}. For critical microanalysis studies, thin-flake specimens are most desirable, especially if the size of individual flakes is small relative to the scale, {approximately}10 {mu}m, over which the primary x rays are typically absorbed. However, a specimen comprised of small flakes may be impractical for many studies. Such a geometry may not indicate the relative positions and orientations of important microstructural features. The lack of sampling volume may also inhibit microanalysis of a specific feature of the microstructure, such as an interface, which may not be represented within the small specimen volume. For such analyses, a specimen geometry that leaves the specimen intact, yet minimizes secondary fluorescence by virtue of having a small geometric factor, may be preferable. Because the geometric factor depends only on the absorption properties of the secondary x ray, a rule-of-thumb maximum secondary fluorescence of an elemental line can be calculated by assuming an extreme microanalysis situation: when the entire disc is composed of the fluoresced element.

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3 p.

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OSTI as DE95012849

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  • 29. annual meeting of the Microbeam Analysis Society, Breckenridge, CO (United States), 6-11 Aug 1995

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  • Other: DE95012849
  • Report No.: CONF-950865--1
  • Grant Number: AC05-76OR00033;AC05-84OR21400
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 73013
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc707537

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  • June 1, 1995

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  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • June 27, 2016, 1:16 p.m.

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Anderson, I.M.; Bentley, J. & Carter, C.B. The self-supporting disc: A specimen geometry exhibiting low secondary characteristic fluorescence, article, June 1, 1995; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc707537/: accessed September 22, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.