Multiple-beam pulse shaping and preamplification

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Glass fusion laser systems typically use a master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) architecture, where control of the optical pulse temporal and spatial parameters is accomplished mainly in the master oscillator and low power optics. The pulses from this low power ``front end`` are amplified in the power amplifier, which modifies the pulse shape temporally and spatially. Nonlinear frequency conversion crystals following the amplifier further change the pulse before it reaches the target. To effectively control the optical pulse on target for different types of experiments, and compensate for nonlinearity in the preceding optics, the front end system must be versatile enough ... continued below

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10 p.

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Wilcox, R.B.; VanWonterghem, B.W.; Burkhart, S.C. & Davin, J.M. November 9, 1994.

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Description

Glass fusion laser systems typically use a master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) architecture, where control of the optical pulse temporal and spatial parameters is accomplished mainly in the master oscillator and low power optics. The pulses from this low power ``front end`` are amplified in the power amplifier, which modifies the pulse shape temporally and spatially. Nonlinear frequency conversion crystals following the amplifier further change the pulse before it reaches the target. To effectively control the optical pulse on target for different types of experiments, and compensate for nonlinearity in the preceding optics, the front end system must be versatile enough to easily control many pulse parameters over a large range. The front end pulse generation system described in this article represents a new approach to this problem. The proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) has 192 beamlines, each of which requires an input pulse of up to 12 Joules in around 4 ns equivalent square pulse length. Considerations of laser architecture for supplying each of these beamlines from a central oscillator system were crucial in the design of the front end. Previous lasers have used bulk optics to split a single oscillator signal and report beams to multiple amplifier chains. A key idea in the current design is to replace bulk optic transport with fibers, eliminating large opto-mechanical subsystems. Another important concept is convenient pulse forming using low voltage integrated optic modulators. The integrated optic and fiber optic concepts resulted in the current pulse generation designs for NEF. An important advantage is that each of the beamlines can have an independently controlled temporal pulse shape, which provides for precise balance of instantaneous power on target.

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10 p.

Notes

OSTI as DE95011738

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  • International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) technical committee meeting on drivers for inertial confinement fusion, Paris (France), 14-18 Nov 1994

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  • Other: DE95011738
  • Report No.: UCRL-JC--117491
  • Report No.: CONF-9411152--4
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 71610
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc707222

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  • November 9, 1994

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • Feb. 17, 2016, 2:39 p.m.

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Wilcox, R.B.; VanWonterghem, B.W.; Burkhart, S.C. & Davin, J.M. Multiple-beam pulse shaping and preamplification, article, November 9, 1994; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc707222/: accessed May 25, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.