Crystal diffraction lens for medical imaging

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Description

A crystal diffraction lens for focusing energetic gamma rays has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory for use in medical imaging of radioactivity in the human body. A common method for locating possible cancerous growths in the body is to inject radioactivity into the blood stream of the patient and then look for any concentration of radioactivity that could be associated with the fast growing cancer cells. Often there are borderline indications of possible cancers that could be due to statistical functions in the measured counting rates. In order to determine if these indications are false or real, one must ... continued below

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14 p.

Creation Information

Smither, R. K. & Roa, D. E. February 25, 2000.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

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  • Argonne National Laboratory
    Publisher Info: Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)
    Place of Publication: Argonne, Illinois

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Description

A crystal diffraction lens for focusing energetic gamma rays has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory for use in medical imaging of radioactivity in the human body. A common method for locating possible cancerous growths in the body is to inject radioactivity into the blood stream of the patient and then look for any concentration of radioactivity that could be associated with the fast growing cancer cells. Often there are borderline indications of possible cancers that could be due to statistical functions in the measured counting rates. In order to determine if these indications are false or real, one must resort to surgical means and take tissue samples in the suspect area. They are developing a system of crystal diffraction lenses that will be incorporated into a 3-D imaging system with better sensitivity (factors of 10 to 100) and better spatial resolution (a few mm in both vertical and horizontal directions) than most systems presently in use. The use of this new imaging system will allow one to eliminate 90% of the false indications and both locate and determine the size of the cancer with mm precision. The lens consists of 900 single crystals of copper, 4 mm x 4 mm on a side and 2--4 mm thick, mounted in 13 concentric rings.

Physical Description

14 p.

Notes

INIS; OSTI as DE00752882

Medium: P; Size: 14 pages

Source

  • SPIE Medical Imaging 2000, San Diego, CA (US), 02/12/2000--02/17/2000

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Identifier

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  • Report No.: ANL/UPD/CP-101205
  • Grant Number: W-31109-ENG-38
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 752882
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc706005

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Creation Date

  • February 25, 2000

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 7, 2017, 2:06 p.m.

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Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Smither, R. K. & Roa, D. E. Crystal diffraction lens for medical imaging, article, February 25, 2000; Argonne, Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc706005/: accessed September 24, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.