Development of a Fully-Automated Monte Carlo Burnup Code Monteburns

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Several computer codes have been developed to perform nuclear burnup calculations over the past few decades. In addition, because of advances in computer technology, it recently has become more desirable to use Monte Carlo techniques for such problems. Monte Carlo techniques generally offer two distinct advantages over discrete ordinate methods: (1) the use of continuous energy cross sections and (2) the ability to model detailed, complex, three-dimensional (3-D) geometries. These advantages allow more accurate burnup results to be obtained, provided that the user possesses the required computing power (which is required for discrete ordinate methods as well). Several linkage codes ... continued below

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4 pages

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Poston, D.I. & Trellue, H.R. January 1, 1999.

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Several computer codes have been developed to perform nuclear burnup calculations over the past few decades. In addition, because of advances in computer technology, it recently has become more desirable to use Monte Carlo techniques for such problems. Monte Carlo techniques generally offer two distinct advantages over discrete ordinate methods: (1) the use of continuous energy cross sections and (2) the ability to model detailed, complex, three-dimensional (3-D) geometries. These advantages allow more accurate burnup results to be obtained, provided that the user possesses the required computing power (which is required for discrete ordinate methods as well). Several linkage codes have been written that combine a Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (such as MCNP<sup>TM</sup>) with a radioactive decay and burnup code. This paper describes one such code that was written at Los Alamos National Laboratory: monteburns. Monteburns links MCNP with the isotope generation and depletion code ORIGEN2. The basis for the development of monteburns was the need for a fully automated code that could perform accurate burnup (and other) calculations for any 3-D system (accelerator-driven or a full reactor core). Before the initial development of monteburns, a list of desired attributes was made and is given below. o The code should be fully automated (that is, after the input is set up, no further user interaction is required). . The code should allow for the irradiation of several materials concurrently (each material is evaluated collectively in MCNP and burned separately in 0RIGEN2). o The code should allow the transfer of materials (shuffling) between regions in MCNP. . The code should allow any materials to be added or removed before, during, or after each step in an automated fashion. . The code should not require the user to provide input for 0RIGEN2 and should have minimal MCNP input file requirements (other than a working MCNP deck). . The code should be relatively easy to use and not require several complicated input files. All of these features have been developed fully or partially in monteburns, although several improvements have yet to be implemented.

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4 pages

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  • American Nuclear Society, Boston, MA, 6/6-10/99

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  • Other: DE00007588
  • Report No.: LA-UR-99-42
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 7588
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc705910

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  • January 1, 1999

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  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • July 25, 2016, 6:06 p.m.

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Poston, D.I. & Trellue, H.R. Development of a Fully-Automated Monte Carlo Burnup Code Monteburns, article, January 1, 1999; Los Alamos, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc705910/: accessed November 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.