Ozone production in the Phoenix urban plume

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In May and June of 1998, the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Chemistry Program conducted an aircraft and surface based field campaign in Phoenix, Arizona, with the overall goal of obtaining a mechanistic understanding of O{sub 3} formation in the metropolitan area. Participants in the study included scientists from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality, Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. On most days, afternoon O{sub 3} levels in Phoenix air basin were within 20 ppb of morning levels, indicating a relatively inactive photochemistry, despite ample sunshine and high NO{sub x} levels. Maximum O{sub 3} levels ... continued below

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7 pages

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Kleinman, L. I. September 1, 2000.

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Description

In May and June of 1998, the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Chemistry Program conducted an aircraft and surface based field campaign in Phoenix, Arizona, with the overall goal of obtaining a mechanistic understanding of O{sub 3} formation in the metropolitan area. Participants in the study included scientists from the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality, Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. On most days, afternoon O{sub 3} levels in Phoenix air basin were within 20 ppb of morning levels, indicating a relatively inactive photochemistry, despite ample sunshine and high NO{sub x} levels. Maximum O{sub 3} levels were about 100 ppb, in contrast to the situation later in the summer when there are usually violations of the Federal 1 hour 120 ppb standard. In this article the authors present a preliminary analysis of the DOE G-1 aircraft observations pertinent to understanding the slow rate of O{sub 3} production in the Phoenix air basin. Comparisons will be made to other locations where higher levels of O{sub 3} and more rapid O{sub 3} production have been observed.

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7 pages

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  • Symposium on Atmospheric Chemistry Issues in the 21st Century, 80th AMS Annual Meeting, Long Beach, CA (US), 01/09/2000--01/14/2000

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  • Report No.: BNL--66852
  • Report No.: KP120201
  • Grant Number: AC02-98CH10886
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 750663
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc705788

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  • September 1, 2000

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  • Sept. 12, 2015, 6:31 a.m.

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  • Nov. 9, 2015, 1:32 p.m.

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Kleinman, L. I. Ozone production in the Phoenix urban plume, article, September 1, 2000; Upton, New York. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc705788/: accessed September 24, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.